Courses of Instruction - Undergraduate

 Course Descriptions

AC Courses

AC-151. Principles of Accounting I. 3 Credits.

Fundamental principles of accounting for business entities; the reporting of financial information to users; basic considerations underlying financial and cost accounting data from a management point of view.

AC-152. Principles of Accounting II. 3 Credits.

Fundamental principles of accounting for business entities the reporting of financial information to users basic considerations underlying financial and cost accounting data from a management point of view. Prerequisites: AC-151.

AC-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

AC-325. Forensic Accounting. 3 Credits.

A basic practical understanding of Forensic Accounting as a management tool. Prerequisites: AC-152.

AC-331. Intermediate Accounting Theory I. 3 Credits.

Traditional financial accounting topics, including recent developments by the leading professional accounting organizations. Prerequisites: AC-152.

AC-332. Intermediate Accounting Theory II. 3 Credits.

Traditional financial accounting topics, including recent developments by the leading professional accounting organizations. Prerequisites: AC-331.

AC-341. Advanced Accounting Theory. 3 Credits.

Study of specialized subject areas rounding out the accounting knowledge required by the beginning career accountant. Prerequisites: AC-332.

AC-420. Principles of IT Auditing. 3 Credits.

Principles of IT Auditing examined from the point of view of information systems and management. IT operations will be examined from both standalone and global environments. The Cobit framework will be introduced for auditing IT operations. Prerequisites: AC-151 OR IS-380 OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.

AC-443. Cost Accounting. 3 Credits.

Study of cost accounting information systems and their importance as an essential management tool. Prerequisites: AC-332.

AC-444. Auditing Principles. 3 Credits.

Study of auditing standards associated with the examination of corporate accounts. Emphasis on audit objectives. Prerequisites: AC-332.

AC-455. Taxation. 3 Credits.

Practical understanding of the Federal Income Tax Law including the basic principles of the Law and their practical application. Prerequisites: AC-152.

AC-474. Accounting for Intercorporate Investment. 3 Credits.

Study of accounting for intercorporate investment parent-subsidiary relationships purchase vs pooling of interests indirect and reciprocal holdings. Prerequisites: AC-332.

AN Courses

AN-100. Introduction to Asian Studies. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the geography, history, and cultures of Asia, as well as to Asian studies as an academic discipline.

AN-113. Elementary Mandarin Chinese I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the tones, pronunciation, characters and basic grammatical principles of Mandarin Chinese. Only for students with no previous Mandarin.

AN-114. Elementary Mandarin Chinese II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the tones, pronunciation, characters and basic grammatical principles of Mandarin Chinese. Only for students with no previous Mandarin. Prerequisites: AN-113 OR JP-113 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

AN-130. Elementary Japanese I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basic language skills of speaking, reading, listening, and writing Japanese through a variety of media.

AN-131. Elementary Japanese II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basic language skills of speaking, reading, listening, and writing Japanese through a variety of media. Prerequisites: AN-130 OR JP-130 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

AN-134. Intermediate Japanese I. 3 Credits.

Further practice to master the basic concepts of rudimentary communication in Japanese. Prerequisites: AN-131 OR JP-131 OR 1-2 YEARS H.S. JAPANESE.

AN-135. Intermediate Japanese II. 3 Credits.

Further practice to master the basic concepts of rudimentary communication in Japanese. Prerequisites: AN-134 OR JP-134.

AN-228. Asian Film. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the history of Asian film industries and landmark films. They will look at the major films and film makers of Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan and Korea, as well as the popularity of the anime phenomenon and Indian Bollywood films.

AN-232. China: Environmental Change. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the social, political, economic and cultural variable that impact the Chinese environmental deterioration and these consequences for the world at large. Alternative models of environmental conservation are included. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

AN-270. History and Culture of Japan. 3 Credits.

A survey of Japanese history from its origins to the present and examination of its culture, as expressed through its customs, art, music, film, and food.

AN-320. Marco Polo and the Silk Road. 3 Credits.

Exploration, through literature, art, film, and music, of Marco Polo?s adventures along the Silk Road as he winds his way through Asia.

AN-360. History and Culture of the Philippines. 3 Credits.

A survey of Filipino history from its origins to the present and examination of its culture, as expressed through its customs, art, music, film, and food.

AN-386. Art and Hinduism. 3 Credits.

The value system of Hinduism and how it is expressed in Hindu art. Comparison with other art traditions. Mandatory museum and temple visits.

AN-400. Spanish Literature of the Philippines. 3 Credits.

A survey of the literature of the Philippines written in Spanish, this course will explore the nation's Spanish heritage in its aesthetic and sociohistorical context. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR SP-199 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

AN-453. The Zen Spirit. 3 Credits.

Chinese and Japanese Buddhist Scriptures. Application of Zen to modern American life. Integration of Zen and Christianity. The practice of zazen. Prerequisites: TH-110.

AR Courses

AR-110. Art in the City. 3 Credits.

New York City examined in its architectural presence, as repository and distributor of world art, and as stimulant to plastic creativity.

AR-127. Introduction to the Visual Arts. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive study of art history, focusing on important masterpieces, styles, and significant artists. By examining painting, sculpture, and architecture, students realize the importance of art in society.

AR-128. Introduction to Music. 3 Credits.

A brief history of Western music since the Renaissance. Composers, styles and representative works from each major period will be discussed.

AR-131. Beginning Painting. 3 Credits.

Introduction to variety of art paints, grounds, brushes, techniques.

AR-140. Figure Structure Workshop. 3 Credits.

A study of the human figure in two and three dimensions working from a plaster model. Proportions of the skeleton and mechanism of motion are emphasized.

AR-151. College Chorale I. 1 Credit.

Semester's active participation (at least15 hours) in one of the college's vocal arts ensembles (both practice and performance). Graded P/F.

AR-157. Introduction to Photography I. 3 Credits.

Beginning with basic camera operation, students learn the visual and technical elements that create a photograph. 35mm camera required.

AR-158. Introduction to Photography II. 3 Credits.

Directed toward developing a personal style of picture taking, this course includes dark-room experience in processing and printing black and white film. Prerequisites: # CM-115 CM-116 CM-117 CM-119 CM-120 OR HP-122 # AR-157.

AR-160. Drawing and Composition Workshop. 3 Credits.

Studio work: theoretical analysis and practical application of some of the components of a work of art: form, line, shape and value.

AR-161. Painting Workshop. 3 Credits.

Studio work: texture, color, and space are studied.

AR-162. Painting and Drawing Workshop. 3 Credits.

Studio work: basic techniques.

AR-165. Figure Painting Workshop. 3 Credits.

Studio work: study of the human form in color.

AR-166. Sculpture Workshop. 3 Credits.

Studio work: modeling in clay based on the human figure.

AR-171. Live Model Figure Drawing Workshop. 3 Credits.

Studio work: study of artistic anatomy from live models.

AR-172. Landscape Painting Workshop. 3 Credits.

Beginning approaches to landscape painting; including composition, perspective, and texture.

AR-175. Acting Workshop I. 3 Credits.

Practice various methods of acting technique from traditional (Stanislavski) to modern (Open Theater). Movement and improvisational exercises. Video tape project.

AR-176. Acting Workshop II. 3 Credits.

Continuation of part I including presentations for theatre and video space. Creation of video suitable for use as an audition piece. Prerequisites: AR-175.

AR-210. Art in the Museums. 3 Credits.

Experience the art of the ancient, renaissance and modern periods through escorted tours of art museums, such as The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Cloisters, The Frick Collection, The Museum of Modern Art, The Guggenheim, The Whitney.

AR-211. Renaissance Art I. 3 Credits.

Study of fourteenth-century Italian art and its development through the fifteenth century: Giotto, Duccio, Donatello, Masaccio, Botticelli, etc.

AR-212. Renaissance Art II. 3 Credits.

Study of the High Renaissance and Mannerism in painting and sculpture, especially Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael.

AR-214. Art Advertising and Design. 3 Credits.

Appreciation of the non-verbal communication of visual images: light, color, shape, line, texture, design principles, etc. Studies through projects creating effective advertising images.

AR-215. Medieval Art. 3 Credits.

A study of Early Christian, Byzantine, Carolingian, Ottonian Romanesque and Gothic art. Emphasis on the beginnings of Christian art and on Gothic cathedrals.

AR-220. Introduction to Computer Art. 3 Credits.

Designed to introduce the student to using the computer for design in InDesign, photo manipulation in Photoshop and illustration in Illustrator. Both artist and non-artist, graphic arts or internet. Projects form basis of professional portfolio.

AR-224. Digital Imaging With Photoshop. 3 Credits.

Photoshop use: production and presentation, printing your work, portfolio preparation and internet emphasized.

AR-225. The Origins of Modern Art. 3 Credits.

A study of Neo-Classical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist and Post Impressionist movements in the arts of the Nineteenth Century.

AR-229. Baroque Art. 3 Credits.

A study of the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Emphasis: Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Velazquez, Zurbaran.

AR-231. Egyptian Art. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of the arts of Egypt and the ancient Near East.

AR-232. Art and Desktop Publishing. 3 Credits.

Creation of a brochure, mailer, newsletter or magazine at home or in business. Use of current programs per business world standards. Emphasis on aesthetic concerns. Prerequisites: 1 COURSE FROM CM-115 CM-116 CM-117 CM-119 CM-120 HP-122.

AR-238. The Science of Art. 3 Credits.

Materials of art and artifacts, scientific and technical principles underlying the creation of art works, authentication and forgery, deterioration due to time and environment, restoration techniques. Three class periods weekly.

AR-240. Cultural Diversity in Art. 3 Credits.

Through guided visits to various ethnic art museums/collections (such as Asia Society, Japan Society, China Institute, African Art Museum, Museum of the American Indian, Jewish Museum) students experience cultural diversity. A multi-cultural course which broadens students' appreciation of ethnic identities through the study of ethnic art.

AR-242. Computer Illustrator. 3 Credits.

Uses in print graphics, advertising, charts for marketing. Graphic implementations in all areas of business and marketing.

AR-250. Live Performance Art. 3 Credits.

Participants will be enlightened, enriched, entertained, by attending performances representative of Broadway musicals, ballet, concerts, dance, and opera.

AR-253. Environmental Art and Issues. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to look at environmental issues through the interpretations of an artistic venue. It explores how interdisciplinary environmental discussions within academic and activist communities can inform the artist and their work as well as society at large. Includes research on topics such as eco-ethic, animal rights, environmental justice, green consumerism and eco-activism. The work created will be presented in a university gallery space, web site and/or through a public dialogue on campus for university students and the community at large. The course is geared toward a range of disciplines within and outside the arts inviting a wide range of students to take this course.

AR-260. Music Theory I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to species counterpoint and common practice harmonic analysis. Prerequisites: AR-128.

AR-261. Music Theory II. 3 Credits.

Advanced common practice harmonic analysis and an introduction to 20th century counterpoint analysis. Prerequisites: AR-128, AR-260.

AR-265. Group Singing I. 3 Credits.

For beginning voice students; basic skills including confidence, self-expression, phonation, diction, phrasing. Prepare audition-ready song.

AR-266. Group Singing II. 3 Credits.

For intermediate-level singing. Performance skills including breath support, resonance, blending, expressiveness. Peer and professional observation. Prerequisites: AR-265.

AR-267. History of Graphic Art. 3 Credits.

This course investigates the evolution of Graphic Arts. The focus of the class will be on individual artists, movements and technologies, exploring the relationship between design and its viewers as well as analyzing the visual attributes that make a work of art.

AR-273. The Story of Rock. 3 Credits.

Analysis of musical and pop cultural trends of the 20th century through today, focusing on the orgins of Rock and Roll, its evolution, and the forms it has inspired, towards a better and more critical understanding of current popular music and its origins.

AR-279. Watercolor Painting. 3 Credits.

Introduction to watercolor painting techniques, watercolors, papers, brushes, methods.

AR-282. Beginning Piano. 3 Credits.

Exercises and songs in the three simple keys (C, G, F; A, E, D). Songs and piano pieces will be practiced and performed. For beginners.

AR-293. Today's Film Scene. 3 Credits.

Students will meet in Manhattan to view and analyze contemporary films, often before they are released to the general public. At times the filmmakers are likely to participate. The course will give students a knowledge of the contemporary film scene as well as skills in film analysis. Prerequisites: 1 COURSE FROM CM-115 CM-116 CM-117 CM-119 CM-120 HP-122.

AR-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

AR-335. Art Appreciation (aesthetics) I. 3 Credits.

A study of the different concepts of beauty, covering Asian and Western art, up to the Impressionists.

AR-336. Art Appreciation (aesthetics) I. 3 Credits.

A study of various contemporary trends in art.

AR-337. Advanced Photography. 3 Credits.

Intensive darkroom work to produce exhibition quality portfolios. Technical information will be stressed. Prerequisites: AR-279.

AR-338. Ethics and Photography. 3 Credits.

The writings of A.D. Coleman, Susan Sontag, James Mitchell and others wi form the basis for analysis of trends in photography. Visits to exhibitions in SoHo and Chelsea will be scheduled.

AR-339. Graphic Publishing. 3 Credits.

Advanced look at InDesign skills of professional print and design studios. Style sheets, master pages and templates. Linear blends, bleeds, color and trapping. Students will produce a real world publication. Prerequisites: AR-232 AR-220 AR-214.

AR-340. The Visual Arts in America. 3 Credits.

A survey of art in the United States from the Colonial period to the present.

AR-350. Typography. 3 Credits.

Placement, sizing, personality, color, tracking, kerning, leading and other aspects of type plus its history and use as abstract design elements. Student create fonts. Prerequisites: AR-214 AR-220 AR-232.

AR-355. The Nude in Art. 3 Credits.

A study of the human body in art as the basis of varying concepts of beauty.

AR-361. Color Photography I. 3 Credits.

This course explores the theory, manipulation, lighting (daylight and flash), and the printing of color photography. Prerequisites: AR-157.

AR-366. Tools of Graphic Art. 3 Credits.

Analysis and skills development in areas of: color, memory management, text, format, web use and print. Projects require use of softwares in tandem. Prerequisites: AR-220 AR-224 AR-232.

AR-367. Advertising and Packaging Design. 3 Credits.

This course explores various approaches to 3-D design. Students develop and esecute package designs, fabrication materials and techniques. Prerequisites: AR-214 AR-220.

AR-368. Graphic Design. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the student to the basic ideas of design: symbology, typography, illustration and photography. The student will be exposed to the exxentials of the field, the use and care of materials, career options, and an introduction to basic terminology. The organization and communication of information through work and image will be emphasized. Prerequisites: AR-214 AR-220.

AR-375. Capturing and Constructing: Camera Raw and iPhoto. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the creative and technical possibilities of photography and digital media. Hands-on sessions as well as demonstrations will enable the student to learn the basics of using a digital camera and the imaging software Photoshop, Camera Raw and iPhoto. Topics to be cover will include camera operation, shutter speed, aperture, focal length, composition, lighting for fine art shooting, uploading files, image enhancement, bit depth, resolution, file size, histograms, curves archiving, organizing and storing work, printing and more. Prerequisites: AR-224.

AR-376. Capturing and Constructing: Digital Photos. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the creative and technical possibilities of photography and digital media. Hands-on sessions as well as demonstrations will enable the student to learn the basics of using a digital camera and the imaging software Photoshops Camera raw and iPhoto. Topics to be cover will include camera operation, shutter speed, aperture, focal length, composition, lighting for fine art shooting, uploading files, image enhancement, bit depth, resolution, file size, histograms, curves archiving, organizing and storing work, printing and more. Prerequisites: AR-157.

AR-381. Art of Web Design. 3 Credits.

Explores artistic aspects, ideas and techniques of Web design using Dreamweaver, creation of text, tables, images and forms, a website. Prerequisites: AR-220, AR-224 OR AR-248.

AR-382. Piano Workshop. 3 Credits.

A studio course to develop student's basic, beginning level skills as well as those of intermediate level students.

AR-383. Computer Animation. 3 Credits.

Basic principles of animation with Image Ready enhanced by Flash application. Prerequisites: AR-220 AR-242 AR-224.

AR-384. Art and Buddhism. 3 Credits.

A value-oriented, in-depth study of Buddhist theology and philosophy as expressed in art. Buddhisms changing visual expressions will be investigated. Emphasis will be placed on artistic expression of religious values.

AR-386. Art and Hinduism. 3 Credits.

The value system of Hinduism and how it is expressed in Hindu art. Comparison with other art traditions. Mandatory museum and temple visits.

AR-399. Tutorial. 3 Credits.

AR-420. New York Theatre Live. 3 Credits.

Appreciation of contemporary theatre through attendance of Broadway, Off Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway theatre in New York City.

AR-430. Senior Thesis Project: Portfolio Presentation. 3 Credits.

This class is designed to provide the Studio Art and Graphic Design student with a cumulative experience of their major. A completed portfolio representing the studio area of specialization, along with a written statement of personal philosophy in the development of the visual imagery, will be presented in the form of a show. A wide variety of career-oriented topics will be discussed. Resume, cover letters and other self-promotional and business skills will be addressed.

AR-499. Short-Term Study Abroad. 3 Credits.

AS Courses

AS-130. Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the study of Latin America as a region-it's history, culture, politics and economic development- and Latino Studies, which examines the experiences of people of Latin American descent in the U. S.

AS-177. Introduction to Africana Studies. 3 Credits.

This course offers an introduction to the field of Africana Studies. It includes the theoretical foundations for this discipline as well as an historical exploration of forces leading to emergence of artistic, music, poetry and social movements.

AS-202. Urban Music: Jazz to Hip-Hop. 3 Credits.

This course studies the history of urban music from jazz to rock and roll up to today's urban sounds. The course will concentrate both on the music and its socioeconomic impact on the urban landscape.

AS-213. Multiculturalism in Justice. 3 Credits.

Understanding community groups of various ethnic, racial and cultural backgrounds, elevating the awareness in Law Enforcement Agencies. Prerequisites: CJ-165 CJ-170.

AS-219. Exploring Urban Experience Through Film. 3 Credits.

This course uses masterpieces of cinema to explore the city and urban culture. Topics will include the economy, race, culture, gender, immigration, gentrification and crime. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

AS-224. Black Hair and Identity in America. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the social, cultural and political significance of black hair in America. It will explore hair's profound impact on identity. Black hair is embedded in notions of race, ethnicity, gender and class. Prerequisites: AS-175 AS-177 SO-121 OR UR-151.

AS-227. Sociology of Salsa. 3 Credits.

This course combines dance lessons with sociological exploration of New York/New Jersey?s salsa scene. Lessons are complemented by discussions on the origins of the music as it relates to Latin American and Caribbean history and Latino migration to the northeast.

AS-230. Black Politics. 3 Credits.

A study of black organizations as interest groups examination of group organizational problems analysis of difficulties encountered by groups in the political interaction of an urban environment. Prerequisites: AS-175 AS-177 SO-121 OR UR-151.

AS-235. Harlem Renaissance. 3 Credits.

The examination of the art, music, poetry, and politics of the Harlem community in the 1920's and 1930's. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

AS-245. Haitians in America: Culture and Identity. 3 Credits.

Examines the history and experiences in America, paying special attention to how and why Haitians come to the U.S. It also explores patterns of settlement and mobility as well as interaction with other groups. Prerequisites: AS-175 OR AS-177 OR SO-121.

AS-273. Global Feminisms. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course explores global issues and debates regarding significant issues affecting women's lives and opportunities for equality.

AS-288. The Role of Religion in Social Protest. 3 Credits.

This course examines various formal and informal roles of religions in social protest from the New York City uprisings through Black Lives Matter and beyond. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151 OR AS-177.

AS-308. Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

This course studies the indigenous and imperial cultures of Africa since 1800 with emphasis on Anglophone and Francophone regions. Prerequisites: HS-121 HS-122.

AS-318. African-American Communication In American Culture. 3 Credits.

The communication styles of African-Americans have been integral in the creation of modern American culture. This course will trace the beginnings of this communication to its expression today in the United States. The evidence includes oral, visual, early written, and electronically mediated communication of African-Americans with specific examples in songs, dance, storytelling, and preaching artifacts, adornments and crafts pamphlets, slave narratives and journals and filmmakers, performers and composers. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

AS-322. Black Novel. 3 Credits.

A review of fictional writings by African-American authors of the 19th and 20th centuries.

AS-324. Poverty and Inequality. 3 Credits.

Description and anaylsis of the causes, characteristics and consequences of poverty. Links between poverty and inequality. Measurement of the different dimensions of poverty and inequality. Comparative analysis of poverty and inequality across countries. Poverty reduction policies and strategies. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

AS-333. Black Community and the Law. 3 Credits.

An examination of the role of the American legal process in African American history from 1619 to the present, with concentration on laws and their application during the slavery and post-slavery era, the early and mid 1900's, and in modern rural and urban life. Topics include civil rights, constitutional, property, and criminal law.

AS-340. Intercultural Relations. 3 Credits.

An examination of the influence of cultural factors on human thought, emotion and action. Theoretical and methodological issues in intercultural relations are reviewed and observational studies conducted. Prerequisites: SO-121.

AS-353. Sociology of the Black Family. 3 Credits.

Course examines the black family in historical and contemporary perspectives. Emphasis is placed on how these are a variety of ?families? in the African-American community as well as all other communities. Prerequisites: AS-175 AS-177 SO-121 OR UR-151.

AS-359. African-American Writers. 3 Credits.

A survey of the major literary achievements of black American writers. May be substituted for EL134. Prerequisites: EL-123 OR HP-119.

AS-399. Tutorial. 1 Credit.

AS-411. Nationalism and Revolution. 3 Credits.

A comparative and analytical study of nationalism and revolutionary movements. Nation-building in contemporary underdeveloped countries.

AS-412. Ethnicity and Race in Urban History. 3 Credits.

Includes the African and European immigrant experiences in America, the effects of slavery and urbanization, and the formation of class consciousness. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151, AND SO-280 AND SO-384.

AS-443. Black Theology. 3 Credits.

The study of the origins and influence of the major religious traditions found in the American black community. May be used as a substitute for Th120. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

AS-454. Black Films. 3 Credits.

A survey of 20th century film making by and about African-Americans. Prerequisites: AS-175 AS-177 SO-121 OR UR-151.

AS-460. U.S. Civil Rights Movement. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the origins, processes, and outcomes of the twentieth century black American Civil Rights struggle.

AS-486. Seminar Political Theory: Genocide. 3 Credits.

After a through conceptualization of genocide, the course will examine case studies of modern genocide, ranging from the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will also be challenged to critique certain academic definitions of genocide and will discuss dehumanization, denial and reconciliation.

AS-489. Globalization and Fieldwork Seminar. 3 Credits.

Short term study/travel course in which students conduct first hand investigations on the effects of globalization in relevant settings. Specific area and topics determined at the beginning of the Academic Year. Locations change every term.

AS-490. Seminar in Africana Studies. 3 Credits.

This capstone course will provide students with the opportunity to synthesis their previous 15 credits, as well as materials from other courses, into a senior thesis research. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

BA Courses

BA-151. Principles of Management. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the management process. Introductory course in management.

BA-155. Principles of Marketing. 3 Credits.

Business activities involved in the flow of goods and services from production to consumption.

BA-172. Principles of Salesmanship. 3 Credits.

Course focus is on the information, skills, and activities necessary for success as a professional salesperson including establishing and maintaining customer rapport and negotiating the sale. Explores the underlying relationship between being personally motivated to succeed and its impact on sales performance, including the motivational factors required to balance the demands of new and existing clients. Ethical principles and concepts are integrated.

BA-214. Corporate Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course equips participants with analytical skills to critically evaluate publicly traded companies. It includes written analysis of companies and the oral presentation of the results to a panel of industry experts. Students registered for this course may also take part in the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) global challenge. Prerequisites: BA-151, BA-155, AND MA-212.

BA-218. Media Business. 3 Credits.

An examination of media as a profit-making industry. The roles of sales, advertising and investors are viewed, as are trends of corporate media and entrepreneurship. Public relations and ethics are introduced. Prerequisites: # 1 COURSE FROM CM-115 CM-116 CM-117 CM-119 CM-120 HP-122.

BA-230. Business Sustainability. 3 Credits.

This introductory course aims to help participants deepen their knowledge of integrating sustainability into business practices, operations and policies. The course will also explore the major sustainability issues and trends that foster organizational resiliency over time and in addition examine the best practices that lead to economic efficiency, social equity and environmental accountability. Prerequisites: BA-151 AND BA-155.

BA-240. Organizational Behavior. 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary study of interactions between individuals and groups within organizations. Prerequisites: BA-151 BA-155.

BA-242. Sales Management. 3 Credits.

Organization and administration of the sales function with emphasis on the human factors. Prerequisites: BA-151 BA-155.

BA-245. Customer Service. 3 Credits.

Marketing techniques and procedures used by organizations to achieve and measure customer satisfaction - an essential in a competitive era. Prerequisites: BA-151 AND BA-155.

BA-246. Export Management. 3 Credits.

Research and studies in foreign markets to locate and develop export business, including payment systems, transportation, and logistics. Prerequisites: BA-151 AND BA-155.

BA-248. International Business and the Global Marketplace. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on explorng terminology, scope, status and evolving patterns of international business. Specifically, the course addresses the role of social, cultural, political, ethical, technological, environmental and economic factors in the international context the impact of global forces on businesses at home and abroad role of governments in promoting and protecting business interests at home and abroad role of international agencies in the functioning of business and the interlink between managerial, operational, marketing, and financial functions in doing business abroad. Prerequisites: # BM-151, BA-151 OR HP-127 # MM-151, BA-155 OR HP-129.

BA-249. Sports and Entertainment Marketing. 3 Credits.

Analysis of strategic marketing processes in the spectator events industry with emphasis on consumers, suppliers, and owners. Prerequisites: BA-151 BA-155.

BA-250. Consumer Behavior. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary approach to the study of marketing with the focus on consumers. Prerequisites: BA-151 BA-155.

BA-282. Leadership. 3 Credits.

An examination of the foundations of leadership by major theorists. Current and emerging leadership models will be studied in the context of the business environment. Prerequisites: BM-240 OR BA-240.

BA-287. Introduction to Business Analytics. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to some of the tools that businesses use to optimize their activities. Students will among others, learn how to use Excel Solver, POM QM and also conduct spreadsheet sensitivity analysis. Prerequisites: BA-240 BA-246 OR BA-250 OR AN EQUIVALENT COURSE APPROVED BY INSTRUCTOR.

BA-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

BA-315. Business and Professional Communication. 3 Credits.

How to communicate in various channels necessary for the efficient functioning of groups and organizations. This includes writing for all forms of print and online, as well as, understanding interpersonal interaction and group dynamics that support and promote effective teamwork. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

BA-319. International Marketing. 3 Credits.

Marketing activities involved in successful international business operations. Emphasis on the application of marketing principles to the international environment. Prerequisites: BA-240 BA-250 OR BA-246 OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.

BA-322. Corporate Situational Analysis and Problem Solving. 3 Credits.

This is an advanced course and involves a student application and competitive selection process. The course focuses on the analysis of complex business problems and their causes, inter-functional implications and development of recommended solutions. These problems encompass a wide range of business disciplines including finance, marketing, public relations, and operations. Extensive use of the case method is used to illuminate key learning points. Students will learn and apply research, decision making and problem solving skills.

BA-325. Ethics: Business and Economic Community. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the responsibilities of management, ranging over problems encountered by both public and private, multinational and local concerns. Prerequisites: BA-240 BA-246 OR BA-250, AND TH-110 AND PL-100.

BA-327. Digital and Social Media Marketing. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the current thinking, practice and developments in digital and social media marketing, including: Social media marketing for B2C, B2B, not-for-profits, Internet marketing, online PR and reputation management, and mobile marketing. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

BA-330. Negotiation and Conflict Resolution. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the nature, cause, progression and resolution of conflicts and disputes. Particular emphasis will be placed on disputes involving commercial issues and businesses. Students will gain knowledge and apply techniques to facilitate, mediate and successfully resolve disputes over a range of situations. Methods of conflict de-escalation and pursuit of settlement through negotiation will be learned and applied. Prerequisites: BA-240 OR BL-161.

BA-340. E-Business. 3 Credits.

Examines new models, themes, and examples for describing electronic commerce and its impact on business and society. Prerequisites: BA-240 BA-246 OR BA-250.

BA-343. Human Resource Management. 3 Credits.

Human resource management and personnel administration. Prerequisites: BA-151 AND BA-155.

BA-347. International Management. 3 Credits.

Examination of global business and the multinational corporation. Analysis and development of management strategies within the context of the political, legal, cultural and socioeconomic environment of the host nations. Prerequisites: BA-240 BA-246 OR BA-250.

BA-350. Operations and Logistics Management. 3 Credits.

A survey of the various operations required to produce goods and services. Prerequisites: BA-240 BA-246 OR BA-250 MA-105 MA-106.

BA-351. Marketing Research. 3 Credits.

Basic methods and tools utilized in gathering and analysis of supportive marketing data for executive decision making. Prerequisites: BA-250 EC-300.

BA-360. Public Relations. 3 Credits.

Influencing public opinion is the major goal of public relations activities. This course examines the roles of opinion research, press agentry, product promotion, publicity, lobbying, public affairs, fund-raising and special events management in creating a favorable image for a client. Writing skills are emphasized. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

BA-363. Entrepreneurship: Creativity and Innovation. 3 Credits.

Challenges and problems in managing small businesses. Techniques of planning, obtaining funding for, and operating new and/or existing business ventures. Prerequisites: BA-240 OR BA-246 OR BA-250.

BA-381. Business Ethics and Legal Liability. 3 Credits.

This course provides an understanding of the legal and other exposures that confront organizations that fail to operate in a framework of honesty, integrity, and ethical behavior. It assists students to understand exposures in contracts and relationships with employees and third parties. It examines ethical behavior in business settings and shows the financial and other benefits to encouraging integrity across the enterprise. Uses case studies and exercises to illustrate concepts.

BA-382. Insurance and Risk Management. 3 Credits.

This course covers hazard risk and insurable exposures and techniques to mitigate them. It begins with the nature of risk. Then it examines avoidance, retention, reduction and transfer of risks. Topics include property, employer and general liability, homeowners and automobile coverages, the role of the modern risk manager.

BA-383. Enterprise-Wide Risk Management. 3 Credits.

This course covers the management of business and operational exposures in a framework of enterprise risk management (ERM). It examines the scope of risk management, the importance of risk identification, and the alignment of risk categories with the corporate business mode. It addresses functional, business unit, and key initiative exposures and the hierarchical structure to effectively manage the exposures. Prerequisites: AC-152 BL-161 EC-102 BA-319 BA-347 OR BA-351.

BA-384. Sarbanes Oxley Compliance. 3 Credits.

This course covers the requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley legislation to increase the reliability of financial reporting and compliance with applicable laws and regulations. It covers the Public Accounting Oversight Board, parties regulated by the Act, policies mandated for public auditing firms, and the role external auditors. A major focus of the course deals dealing with the securities acts, audit and non-audit services, the role of the board of directors, and penalties for violations of securities and other laws.

BA-388. Introduction to Predictive Analytics and Visualization. 3 Credits.

In this course students are introduced to a variety of techniques including predictive modeling, data mining, and data visualization to analyze current and historical facts to make predictions about future business events. Students will, among others, learn how to improve their decision-making skills by boosting their visual thinking in this course. Prerequisites: BA-287.

BA-394. Industry Internship. 3 Credits.

This field-work course involves the application of knowledge emphasizing the synthesis of business analytics theories and skills with industry experience. Students will work with actual businesses for practical experience. Seminars will be held and an evaluation paper required. Prerequisites: BA-287.

BA-414. Predictive Modeling. 3 Credits.

The course will introduce the student to higher level techniques of predictive modeling and analytics in a data-rich business environment. It covers the process of formulating business objectives, data selection, preparation, and partition to successfully design, build, evaluate and implement predictive models or a variety of practical business applications. It is a practice-oriented course will focus on applying data analytic tools to help companies answer critical business questions. Prerequisites: BA-287.

BA-421. Doing Business Overseas. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to expose students to the global business environment through short-term study visits to selected overseas countries. The aim is to help participants develop a better and more practical understanding of the political, economic, legal and cultural environments of the countries visited. Prerequisites: BA-240, BA-246, OR BA-250.

BA-458. Business Strategy. 3 Credits.

In this class students learn and practice how to craft, implement and evaluate cross-functional decisions in an integrated fashion. They develop their strategic management skills through a series of business strategy simulation games. As part of a management team, they "own" a business and play the role of managers who develop policies and plans to achieve organizational objectives. Prerequisites: AC-152 BL-161 EC-102 AND EC-300.

BA-465. Executive Seminar. 3 Credits.

An examination of contemporary management issues conducted by senior decision makers from both private and public sectors. Open by invitation only to Honors students and other qualified advanced undergraduates.

BA-496. Seminar in Business Administration. 3 Credits.

This professional consultancy capstone course helps students to integrate and apply concepts, skills and techniques acquired in previous courses. The course requires deep student engagement, team collaboration and problem solving. This will be achieved by engaging with actual small/mid-size businesses. Participants will plan, execute and report findings of a consulting engagement with an assigned local business. Prerequisites: BA-458, AND EITHER FN-401 OR FN-415.

BA-499. Business Internship Experience. 3 Credits.

This course is for upper level students, and involves an experiential learning component. Students must have an approved internship during the semester of enrollment and must work at least 10 hours per week in order to be eligible to register. Course content focuses on development of crucial soft skills, like interpersonal communication, teamwork, leadership, negotiation in the context of a job or internship as well as application of business knowledge to situations, experiences, problem-solving and adapting to the work environment. Prerequisites: BA-151, BA-155, AND JUNIOR STATUS.

BC Courses

BC-390. Special Topics: Biological Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Conferences and literature research directed to the study of a particular area of biological chemistry. Area selected must coincide with faculty expertise. Prerequisites: BI-240 CH-366.

BC-399. Tutorial. 1 Credit.

BC-420. Instructional Methods: Biochemical Analysis I. 2 Credits.

Modern instrumental techniques in qualitative and quantitative studies of biochemical systems exposure to a broad range of instrumental methods. Prerequisites: BI-240 CH-366.

BC-421. Instrumental Analysis for Biochemistry. 2 Credits.

Modern instrumental techniques in qualitative and quantitative studies of biochemical systems exposure to a broad range of instrumental methods. Prerequisites: BC-420.

BC-442. Biochemistry I. 3 Credits.

Protein structure and function, enzymes, enzyme kinetics and mechanism, metabolism, techniques in protein chemistry.

BC-443. Biochemistry II. 3 Credits.

Biosynthesis, hormone regulation, RNA and DNA metabolism, Regulation of gene expression, Techniques in nucleic acid chemistry.

BC-492. Biological Chemistry. 3 Credits.

The chemistry and metabolism of biological compounds, including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. Enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics and cellular organization. Expression and processing of biological information including replication of DNA, transcription, translation, regulation and recombinant DNA technology. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI Courses

BI-122. Nutrition in Health and Disease. 3 Credits.

Introduction to basic concepts and controversies of nutrition as related to health and disease. An analysis of nutrients, food choices, and human health.

BI-123. Concepts of Biology. 3 Credits.

The major concepts which unify the attempt of scientist to achieve an ever increasing understanding of life. The comprehension of these concepts enables a solid foundation in the scientific method, chemistry of life, metabolism, genetics, evolution and diversity of life.

BI-124. Human Structure and Function. 3 Credits.

The morphology and physiology of the human body. The structure and role of all systems. Interaction of systems with each other and with the environment.

BI-126. The Human Environment. 3 Credits.

Relationships between humans and their environment. Sources of energy and food. Pollution, conservation of natural resources, and population problems.

BI-129. Biological Issues: Decisions and Ethics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to biological issues that are controversial and require informed decisions and ethical choices. Topics considered in the course include reproductive issues, informed consent, right to care and treatment, biological experimentation, privacy, public health, genetics, and the environment.

BI-130. Natural History of New Jersey. 3 Credits.

An overview of the animals and plants of New Jersey as well as physical features such as geology and climate. Emphasis on the diversity of NJ wildlife and habitats, with discussion of issues such as conservation of natural resources, forest and wildlife management, and pollution. Will be taught through field trips.

BI-140. Introductory Astrobiology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to astronomy and the search for life beyond Earth. Topics include the definition and origin of life, the search for habitable planets, and human exploration of our solar system and beyond.

BI-161. Basic Microbiology. 4 Credits.

The biology of bacteria and viruses: their morphology, physiology, and ecology. The role of microorganisms in disease and the principles of immunology. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: BI-161L.

BI-171. Anatomy and Physiology I. 4 Credits.

Emphasis on the structure and function of the major systems of the human body and its variations from the normal. The cellular, embryological, and genetic basis of structure and function are also considered. Includes laboratory. Not open to majors in biology and natural sciences. Prerequisites: BI-171L.

BI-172. Anatomy and Physiology II. 4 Credits.

Emphasis on the structure and function of the major systems of the human body and its variations from the normal. The cellular, embryological, and genetic basis of structure and function are also considered. Includes laboratory. Not open to majors in biology or natural sciences.

BI-183. General Biology I. 3 Credits.

Biological principles including scientific method, biological chemistry concepts, characteristics of life, cells and reactions, Mendelian and Molecular Genetics. Prerequisites: BI-185.

BI-184. General Biology II. 3 Credits.

Biological principles including origin of life, evolution, population genetics, diversity of life, comparative plant and animal biology, ecology.

BI-185. General Biology I Lab. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany Bi183. Prerequisites: BI-183.

BI-186. General Biology II Lab. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany Bi184. Prerequisites: BI-184.

BI-215. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. 4 Credits.

Studies of the structure and function of organ systems with emphasis on homeostatic regulatory mechanisms. Include laboratory.

BI-237. Forensic Science. 3 Credits.

The basic concepts and practices of biology and chemistry as applied to criminal investigation, examining and preserving forensic evidence, conducting crime-scene investigations, and science in the courts. Laboratory experience. Not open to Biology majors. Prerequisites: BI-184.

BI-240. Cell and Molecular Biology. 4 Credits.

Living systems at the cellular, subcellular, and molecular levels, Emphasis on molecular control of cellular activity, intermediate metabolism, and energy transformation. Includes laboratory.

BI-271. Concepts of Public Health. 3 Credits.

Introduction to Public Health Issues - public health laws, policy cycle, demographics, and epidemiological concepts and applications.

BI-295. Co-Op. 1 Credit.

BI-310. Ecology. 4 Credits.

The usual definition of ecology - the relationship between organisms and their environment - is expanded to include the biological as well as the physical conditions under which an organism, population, or species lives to show that relationships involve the interactions between the biotic world and the physical world as well as between members of the same species and between different species. Includes laboratory.

BI-313. Human Evolution Ecology and Adaptation. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course focuses on evolutionary adaptations of the human species to nature and ways it has adapted nature to serve its needs. These adaptations and their consequences for changes in human ways of life are central to this course. Prerequisites: BI-184 OR SO-121.

BI-325. Advanced Topics in Anatomy and Physiology. 3 Credits.

Continuation of BI-215, Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. Selected topics in anatomy and physiology with special reference to current clinical issues. Prerequisites: BI-215.

BI-326. Advanced Topics in Anatomy and Physiology Lab. 1 Credit.

Laboratory course to accompany BI-325, Adv.Topics in Anatomy and Physiology. Prerequisites: BI-215.

BI-340. Pathophysiology. 3 Credits.

Biological processes which affect the human body's dynamic equilibrium, or homeostasis, associated with potential or actual disease conditions. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-350. Genetics. 4 Credits.

Theories of heredity and variation. Pre- Mendelian, Mendelian, cytogenetics, and population genetics. Application of theories in laboratory. Includes laboratory.

BI-361. Criminalistics and Forensic Science. 3 Credits.

The theory and application of the principles of forensic science. Lab includes an analysis of the techniques and procedures in forensic science. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-370. General Virology. 3 Credits.

Study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of viruses. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-393. Civilization and Disease. 3 Credits.

A survey of the impact of disease on the course of human history. Prerequisites: BI-184.

BI-394. Epidemiology. 3 Credits.

Applications of epidemiologic methods and procedures to the study of the distribution and determinants of health and diseases in populations. Infections versus chronic diseases, data sources, study design and measures of morbidity and mortality will be studied. Prerequisites: MA-132 BI-184.

BI-415. Hematology. 3 Credits.

The study diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the blood. The course will cover areas such as anemia, thrombocytopenia, enlarged lymph nodes or spleen, bleeding and clotting disorders. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-416. Fundamentals of Neuroscience. 4 Credits.

The study of cell structure and organization of the vertebrate central nervous system, mechanisms of neural signaling, the physiological and anatomical bases of behavior emphasizing mammalian sensory, motor, regulatory, and motivational mechanisms involved in the control of behavior and higher mental processes.

BI-435. Development. 3 Credits.

Developmental phenomena are approached first by analysis of the molecular and cellular basis of these processes, which are common to the eukaryotes, and secondly by descriptions of selected examples of development, including fungi, protozoa, algae, higher plants, and invertebrates. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-450. Microbiology. 4 Credits.

Microorganisms, with emphasis on the morphology, physiology, and ecological roles of bacteria and viruses. Principles of immunology. Includes laboratory.

BI-452. Evolution. 3 Credits.

Consideration of organic evolution including the origin of cells, adaptive radiation, natural selection, population genetics, and human evolution. Prerequisites: BI-215.

BI-454. Endocrinology. 3 Credits.

Hormones as agents of homeostasis and growth. Hormonal regulation of reproduction. Investigative methods in endocrinology. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-458. Parasitology. 3 Credits.

Biology, epidemiology, pathology, and diagnosis of animal and human parasites. Physiology of host-parasite interplay. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-460. Histology. 3 Credits.

Cell types and tissues of vertebrates on the microscopic and submicroscopic levels disposition of tissues in the various organs. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-462. Botany. 3 Credits.

Structure, functions, development, and ecological relationships of higher plants. Evolutionary and phylogenetic survey of the plant kingdom (including fungi). Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-464. Immunology. 3 Credits.

The study of the basic concepts of cellular and humoral products of the immune system. Genetics of immunoglobulin production, antigen - antibody reactions, immunopathological mechanisms of hypersensitivity, auto immunity, transplantation and immunodeficiency. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-469. Human Nutrition. 3 Credits.

The study of nutritional principles and the application of these principles to daily health maintenance as well as conditions which require special diet management. Prerequisites: BI-215.

BI-473. Vertebrate Zoology. 3 Credits.

A survey of the vertebrates with an emphasis on classification, structure, function, and evolution. Laboratory included. Prerequisites: BI-215.

BI-475. Medical Botany. 3 Credits.

Medicinal uses of plants in historic and modern times. Investigation of mode of action of selective plant-derived conventional medicine and what is known about the scientific basis of some popular folk remedies. Prerequisites: BI-215.

BI-485. Current Issues in Biology. 3 Credits.

Current topics in the biological sciences. Lectures, discussions and critical analysis of journal articles and other readings related to the course. Capstone for Biology majors. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-486. Current Issues in Health Education. 3 Credits.

To study relevant current health issues such as obesity, unhealthy dietary problems, apnea, tobacco use, alcohol, drugs, heart disease and cancer.

BI-488. Astrobiology. 3 Credits.

The biological perspective on the origin of life, its evolution, the search for habitable planets, exploration of our solar system and beyond, and the future of life on Earth and elsewhere. Prerequisites: BI-184.

BI-497. Research I. 2 Credits.

Introduction to biological research. Topics will include: experimental research techniques, bibliographic searching, the review and publishing process, presentation of papers at scientific meetings and writing grants. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-498. Research II. 2 Credits.

An original independent lab research project for upper-level students, under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BI-499. Special Projects in Biology. 3 Credits.

Work in various fields of biology not covered by regular courses. Offered when sufficient student interest is demonstrated in an area coinciding with faculty specialization. (1 to 3 credits).

BL Courses

BL-161. Introduction to Law and Contracts. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the legal system; the nature of contracts; the statute of frauds; assignment of contracts; methods of discharging obligations in contract; remedies upon breach of contract.

BL-162. Agency and Business Organization. 3 Credits.

The nature and creation of an agency relationship, a partnership, a corporation the rights and duties of the various parties the law of trade regulation and unfair competition. Prerequisites: BL-161.

BL-165. International Law and Property Rights. 3 Credits.

The key to international business success is minimizing risk. The course emphasizes the management of risk when doing business over great distances. Examines legal aspects of trade, intellectual property and foreign direct investment.

BL-241. Real and Personal Property. 3 Credits.

The nature of real and personal property methods of transferring title bailment duties and liabilities of common carriers rights of society trusts insurance security interest. Prerequisites: BL-161.

BL-250. Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

BL-251. Uniform Commercial Code. 3 Credits.

Study of articles 1, 2, 3, 4 and 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Form and content of commercial paper bank deposits and collections security interest in personal property product liability. Prerequisites: BL-161.

BL-330. Negotiation and Conflict Resolution. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the nature, cause, progression and resolution of conflicts and disputes. Particular emphasis will be placed on disputes involving commercial issues and businesses. Students will gain knowledge and apply techniques to facilitate, mediate and successfully resolve disputes over a range of situations. Methods of conflict de-escalation and pursuit of settlement through negotiation will be learned and applied. Prerequisites: BA-240 OR BL-161.

BL-333. Environmental Law. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to expose students to several environmental statutes including the Clean Air Act and the Pollution Control Law, as well as environmental sustainability. Prerequisites: BL-161.

BL-399. Tutorial. 1 Credit.

BL-421. Doing Business Overseas. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to expose students to the global business and legal environment through short-term study visits to selected overseas countries. The aim is to help participants develop a better and more practical understanding of the political, economic, legal and cultural environments of the countries visited. Prerequisites: BL-161 OR LW-155.

BT Courses

BT-110. Science Goes to the Movies. 3 Credits.

This course considers the evolution of the science behind the movies - the technical advances that have made modern movie making possible and how the treatment of science, scientific discovery and inventions have evolved particular movie genres. Lectures and movie clips will be used to illustrate the above.

BT-130. Technology in the 21st Century. 3 Credits.

This course will discuss the history, development and scientific breakthroughs that have led to the amazing devices and technologies available to humans today. Particular attention to the people, time and places involved in the development of inventions like TV, radio, computers, phones, transmission of electric power, movies, and some of the many advances in genetics and medicine.

BT-140. How Stuff Works. 3 Credits.

This course will illustrate how the many devices we use in everyday life were invented and how they work. Devices like the radio, TV, microwave, smart phones, computers, etc. will be used as examples.

BT-150. The Gene - Mystery of Inheritance. 3 Credits.

A Historical and Scientific Journey into the Mystery of Inheritance: In the past 150 years, the concept of the Gene - the molecular particle that contains the information of inheritance - has enriched human understanding of genetics. We now have the tools to control some aspects of genetics and even alter our own evolution. This course will explore this scientific journey - using the contributions of the many scientists who have written a story that is changing living history itself.

BT-301. Medical Immunology. 3 Credits.

An examination of the basics of immunology from the molecular to the cellular and organism level. A discussion of interactions in the healthy and disease states and the use of immunotherapy in medicine and the future of diagnostic immunology in health care. Prerequisites: BI-240.

BT-420. Biomedical Applications of DNA Technologies. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the use of current DNA technologies for biomedical applications. Specific emphasis will be placed on the use of these technologies in gene transfer, gene identification, genomics and gene therapy. Prerequisites: BI-240 BI-350 CH-252.

BT-429. Special Topics in Biotechnology. 3 Credits.

This course will explore current and new technologies developments in biotechnology. It will include the use of computer image analysis, nuclear transplantation, confocal microscopy, and protein separation technology and micro-array hybridyation. Ethical parties will be considered. Prerequisites: BI-240 BI-350 CH-252.

BT-440. Research in Biotechnology I. 2 Credits.

This laboratory course will include experience in clinical cytogenesis, molecular and biochemical genetic testing, bioinformatics, micro array chip technology, PCR and various other applications of biotechnology techniques for clinical and research work. Prerequisites: BI-240 BI-350 CH-252.

BT-441. Research in Biotechnology II. 2 Credits.

This laboratory course builds on the previous course (Research in Biotechnology I) and expands the student's knowledge and skills in clinical cytogenesis, molecular and biochemical genetic testing, DNA microscopy, chip technology, PCR and various other applications of biotechnology techniques for clinical and research work. Prerequisites: BT-440 BI-240 BI-350 CH-252.

CASE Courses

CASE-105. Strategic Learning for College Success. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to help students understand which behaviors lead to academic success in college. Students will be provided with resources, strategies and opportunities to improve their academic skills.

CC Courses

CC-287. The City of Rome. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the history of the City of Rome with emphasis on art and architecture. An artistic history of Rome from prehistoric times through the eighteenth century.

CH Courses

CH-108. Science for Educators. 3 Credits.

A study of the concepts that underlie the natural science content in the elementary school curriculum in the United States. Topics include matter and energy, simple machines, sound, light, weather and climate, structure of the earth and the universe, electricity, and living things. The course is intended for individuals who expect to teach in primary & elementary school.

CH-110. Chemical Principles. 3 Credits.

Structure of matter, chemical reactions, stoichiometry; preparatory course for CH-131.

CH-129. Science Fact Or Science Fiction?. 3 Credits.

Students will review a selection of science fiction short stories, novels and films--in class discussion and research writing--to understand the science behind these works, in an attempt to separate fact from fiction. Partially fulfills the core requirement in natural science.

CH-130. Chemistry and Cooking: Perfect Together. 3 Credits.

A look at the science behind cooking, including choice of cooking method, purpose of ingredients in a recipe, ethnic cuisines, and techniques. Course will include hands-on experience.

CH-131. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis I. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the laws and theories of chemistry, emphasizing fundamental mathematical and laboratory skills required for expertise in the field. Three class periods, one four-hour laboratory period weekly. Prerequisites: CH-131L.

CH-132. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis II. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the laws and theories of chemistry, emphasizing fundamental mathematical and laboratory skills required for expertise in the field. Three class periods, one four-hour laboratory period weekly.

CH-237. Forensic Science. 3 Credits.

The basic concepts and practices of biology and chemistry as applied to criminal investigation, examining and preserving forensic evidence, conducting crime-scene investigations, science in the courts, laboratory experience. Three class periods weekly. Prerequisites: BI-122 OR BI-184.

CH-238. The Science of Art. 3 Credits.

Materials of art and artifacts, scientific and technical principles underlying the creation of art works, authentication and forgery, deterioration due to time and environment, restoration techniques. Three class periods weekly.

CH-251. Organic Chemistry I. 4 Credits.

Nomenclature, structure, reactions and spectroscopy of organic compounds with emphasis on reaction mechanisms; selected laboratory experiments and preparations. Three class periods, one four-hour laboratory period weekly.

CH-252. Organic Chemistry II. 4 Credits.

Nomenclature, structure, reactions and spectroscopy of organic compounds with emphasis on reaction mechanisms; selected laboratory experiments and preparations. Three class periods, one four-hour laboratory period weekly.

CH-295. Chemistry Coop. 3 Credits.

CH-329. Analytical Chemistry. 4 Credits.

Statistical methods principles and procedures of quantitative analysis titrimetric, potentiometric and colorimetric methods. Three class periods, one four-hour laboratory period weekly. Prerequisites: CH-132.

CH-353. Medicinal Chemistry. 3 Credits.

An overview of modern day drug discovery, enzymes, receptors, pharmacokinetics and pharmaceutical synthesis. Prerequisites: CH-251.

CH-361. Criminalistics and Forensic Science. 3 Credits.

The theory and application of the principles of forensic science. Lab includes an analysis of the techniques and procedures in forensic science. Prerequisites: CH-132.

CH-365. Physical Chemistry I. 4 Credits.

Physico-chemical properties of gases, liquids and solids thermodynamics solutions and colloids electro-chemistry chemical kinetics nuclear, atomic and molecular structure. Three class periods one four-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: CH-132 PC-186 MA-273.

CH-366. Physical Chemistry II. 4 Credits.

Physico-chemical properties of gases, liquids and solids thermodynamics solutions and colloids electro-chemistry chemical kinetics nuclear, atomic and molecular structure. Three class periods one four-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: CH-365.

CH-421. Instrumental Analysis for Biochemistry. 2 Credits.

Theory and application of modern instrumentation including: IR, NMR, MS, UV-VIS, LC, GC. Prerequisites: CH-329.

CH-442. Biochemistry I. 3 Credits.

Protein structure and function, enzymes, enzyme kinetics and mechanism, metabolism, techniques in protein chemistry.

CH-443. Biochemistry II. 3 Credits.

Biosynthesis, hormone regulation, RNA and DNA metabolism, Regulation of gene expression, Techniques in nucleic acid chemistry.

CH-449. Inorganic Chemistry. 4 Credits.

The electronic structure of matter; nature of the chemical bond; ionic solids; symmetry; transition metal and organometallic chemistry. Three class periods, one four-hour laboratory period weekly.

CH-460. Instrumental Analysis. 4 Credits.

Theory and applications of current techniques includes spectroscopic (IR, AA, UV-Visible, NMR, mass), electro chemical, and chromatographic methods of analysis along with wet chemical methods. Three class periods, one four-hour laboratory period weekly. Prerequisites: CH-329.

CH-499. Research in Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Independent research on an assigned problem; seminar extends through the entire year. Hours arranged with the individual mentor but the group meets weekly for one hour.

CJ Courses

CJ-165. Introduction to Criminology. 3 Credits.

Theories and research findings on lawbreaking: the role of criminal law; types of criminal careers; crime prevention and the criminal justice system.

CJ-170. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

The criminal justice process from arrest through conviction: the law of arrest, the role of the prosecutor, plea bargaining, sentencing practices, jury trials, diversion and alternatives to imprisonment. Careers in criminal justice.

CJ-175. Introduction to Law Enforcement. 3 Credits.

The police in modern urban society: policewomen, the training of police, police corruption, social science research on the police.

CJ-177. Police Culture. 3 Credits.

The total way of life of police: formal and informal on the job and off the job. Police norms, values, beliefs and behavior. Police brutality, corruption, community relations, misunderstandings, and scapegoating are considered. Prerequisites: CJ-175 OR CJ-170.

CJ-210. Multiculturalism in Justice. 3 Credits.

Understanding community groups of various ethnic, racial and cultural backgrounds, elevating the awareness in Law Enforcement Agencies. Prerequisites: CJ-165, CJ-170.

CJ-222. Family Law. 3 Credits.

A study of laws and court decisions regarding marriage, cohabitation, divorce, child custody and support, reproductive rights, adoption, parental rights and child abuse and neglect. Prerequisites: CJ-165.

CJ-230. Homeland Security and Terrorism. 3 Credits.

Introduction to and understanding the importance of Homeland Security with dealing with contemporary terrorism. Prerequisites: CJ-170.

CJ-237. Forensic Science. 3 Credits.

The basic concepts and practices of biology and chemistry as applied to criminal investigation, examining and preserving forensic evidence, conducting crime-scene investigations, science in the courts, laboratory experience. Three class periods weekly. Prerequisites: BI-122 OR BI-184.

CJ-240. Gangs and Organized Crime. 3 Credits.

Examines the street gang from Colonial era America to present day. Explores ethnic organized crime groups, the connections between groups, drug trafficking, extortion, prostitution, money laundering, and violent criminal activity.

CJ-250. Victimology. 3 Credits.

Contemporary developments in Victimology conceptual boundaries, basic concepts and literature subfields and role as a field of study within criminal justice. The historical and emerging roles of Victimology and various aspects of victimization the social, psychological, financial and other impacts of crime. Prerequisites: CJ-165 CJ-170.

CJ-253. Social Deviance. 3 Credits.

Explores the concepts of social norms, egocentricity, and ethnocentricity. Examines the relativity of deviance including criminal behavior, human sexuality, drug use, suicide, and other alternative forms of behavior.

CJ-258. Criminal Justice Ethics. 3 Credits.

Examines the criminal justice system from the ethical point of view. Among the topics discussed are police procedures and human rights, the conduct of trials, due process of law and the operation of correctional facilities. Prerequisites: # PL-101 PL-110 OR HP-116 # CM-115 CM-116 CM-117 CM-119 CM-120 OR HP-122.

CJ-260. Traffic Management. 3 Credits.

The sources of traffic problems: traffic engineering and travel patterns. Traffic jams and rush hour collisions and disabled vehicles. Managing volume detours and advance warnings. Coordinating street traffic and highway operations. Zero tolerance programs for moving violations and equipment violations. Crime detection: stolen vehicles, fugitives, smuggling. Prerequisites: SO-175.

CJ-265. History of Crime and Punishment. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach to crime and delinquency, both as a philosophical and historical exercise in corrections and contemporary criminal justice systems. Provides an understanding of how crime plays a role in the historic development of the criminal justice system.

CJ-280. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Credits.

Theories of delinquency causation; the family and delinquency; problems of adolescence; the juvenile justice system; delinquency prevention programs: methods of treatment; alcohol and drug abuse; child abuse and neglect.

CJ-285. Criminal Corrections Systems. 3 Credits.

Objectives of punishment, jails and their contemporary problems types of prisons corrections officers and their training prison work, education and treatment programs inmate social structure parole and reintegration programs. Prerequisites: CJ-165.

CJ-290. Comparative Justice Systems. 3 Credits.

Post conviction differences between the United States and several other nations: sentencing, probation, fines, prison systems and alternative punishments, highlighting Japan, Canada, India/Egypt. Stress on values and political influences. Prerequisites: CJ-165.

CJ-295. Cooperative Education. 3 Credits.

Cooperative work experience.

CJ-298. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive interdisciplinary understanding of international justice systems and institutions with the primary emphasis on the history and development of legal systems. The study of the police organizations, the courts, the criminal sentencing process and rehabilitative institutions and their respective jurisdictions.

CJ-299. Leadership for Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

Provides students with a solid foundation in leadership principles and effectively leading change in criminal justice agencies.

CJ-306. Cops, Crime and Cinema: Criminal Justice in Film. 3 Credits.

An examination of the images the popular film media portrays of law enforcement, corrections, and the courts, and how these views differ from the reality of the criminal justice system.

CJ-315. Criminal Procedure. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the fourth, fifth, sixth, and eighth amendments to the Constitution as they apply to criminal suspects and defendants.

CJ-316. Criminal Evidence. 3 Credits.

The nature of evidence, its classification, admissibility, weight and relevance the trial record and rules of evidence hearsay and its exceptions the constitutional issues in the gathering and introduction of evidence expert and scientific evidence. Prerequisites: CJ-170.

CJ-333. Gender Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

An in-depth survey of changing social values about gender, changing criminal codes about sex crimes, changing law enforcement policies and procedures in prosecuting sex offenders, and emerging legal doctrines about privacy and sexual rights. Prerequisites: CJ-170 OR CJ-390 OR SO-121 OR WS-140.

CJ-350. Research Techniques and Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

Methods of scientific inquiry in the field of criminal justice: theory and research causation and validity research design, conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, sampling survey research, field research, agency records, content analysis, secondary data, program evaluation and analysis of data. Prerequisites: CJ-165.

CJ-357. Infamous Crimes and Criminals. 3 Credits.

A survey of anti-social behavior manifested by infamous criminals including serial murderers, mass murderers, and organized crime members. The impact of these crimes on victims and society the role of law enforcement agencies and profiling. Prerequisites: CJ-165.

CJ-358. White Collar Crime. 3 Credits.

Types of crime by the privileged: crimes of the professions: employee pilferage, embezzlement and fraud corporate crime and the crimes of managers political corruption and crimes of public officials. Techniques of investigation and prosecution for upper class defendants. Prerequisites: CJ-165.

CJ-359. Corruption. 3 Credits.

Analysis of deviance and criminal activities of corporations and government agencies. sociological and psychological implications are discussed. Organizational processes of communication, power, socialization, group processes and ethics are analyzed. Prerequisites: CJ-165.

CJ-390. Criminal Law. 3 Credits.

Origins of the criminal law from the Napoleonic Code and the English common law; substantive and procedural criminal law. The new state penal codes.

CJ-395. Probation and Parole. 3 Credits.

Techniques, procedures and regulations of supervision of criminal offenders. Training and preparation of parole and probation officers. Prerequisites: CJ-165.

CJ-396. Community Policing. 3 Credits.

Police involvement in the community: regular and meaningful contact, quality of life conditions, problem solving and coordination with community service organizations. Crime information, investigation and prevention through community relations. Prerequisites: CJ-170 OR CJ-175.

CJ-400. Police Administration. 3 Credits.

The management of law enforcement agencies recruitment and testing training and supervision, evaluation and promotion, research and planning, budget management and coordination with other municipal agencies. Prerequisites: CJ-170 OR CJ-175.

CJ-405. Crime Investigation. 3 Credits.

Primary crime investigation, preservation of the crime scene and identification of witnesses. Secondary investigation; use of computerized data bases, development of witnesses, role of informants, criminalistics and the role of the evidence laboratory.

CJ-406. Homicide: Investigation and Prosecution. 3 Credits.

Crime scenes: physical evidence and witnesses, constructing the scenario. Prosecution: case evaluation, pretrial and grand jury. Plea bargaining and trial strategies.

CJ-418. Introduction to Forensics Techniques. 3 Credits.

The basic concepts of forensic science emphasizing recognition, evaluation, and utilization of physical evidence. The significance of forensics types, classification, collection and preservation of evidence rules governing scientific and physical evidence and expert testimony. Prerequisites: CJ-175.

CJ-419. Terrorism and Threat Assessment. 3 Credits.

Provides students interested in intelligence research with a fundamental knowledge of terrorism theory, statutes and groups. Emphasizes entities with access to radiological, biological, and chemical weapons and their delivery systems. Prerequisites: CJ-170 OR CJ-240.

CJ-420. Drugs, Society and Human Behavior. 3 Credits.

Processes of interaction through which substance abusing careers are developed and maintained substance abusers and crime impact upon families and communities organized public response. Prerequisites: CJ-165.

CJ-435. Police Patrol. 3 Credits.

The police mission in a democratic multicultural society: staffing, management and rewards for routine patrol. Traffic, calls for help, crimes in progress calls. Tactics and strategies. Prerequisites: CJ-170 OR CJ-175.

CJ-485. Child Protection Agencies and the Law. 3 Credits.

Emphasizes state-level child protection agencies federal and state statutes affecting child welfare and theories of abuse and maltreatment. Prerequisites: CJ-170.

CJ-486. Internship I. 3 Credits.

Provides students interested in pursuing careers in criminal justice with field placements in law enforcement, courts, corrections or investigative agencies.

CJ-487. Internship II. 3 Credits.

Provides students interested in pursuing careers in criminal justice with field placements in law enforcement, courts, corrections or investigative agencies. Normally runs in the spring semester.

CJ-489. Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

The capstone course for the Criminal Justice major. This course allows students the opportunity to explore career options prior to graduation, or to pursue a special topic within the Criminal Justice arena. Prerequisites: CJ-165 CJ-170 CJ-350.

CM Courses

CM-001. Essential Writing I. 3 Credits.

Emphasis on basic sentence patterns, paragraphing, and organization of ideas through pre-writing. Three class meetings weekly.

CM-003. Essential Writing II. 3 Credits.

Further emphasis on preparation for essay writing. Attention to idiom, sentence patterns, and organization. Prerequisites: CM-001.

CM-104. Introduction to English Composition. 3 Credits.

Instruction and practice in writing and reading English prose, with special emphasis upon individual development. The course progresses from personal experience to critical writing and research, and includes individual instruction and mandatory laboratory work (in CALL) in English grammar, spelling, and sentence structure. Special use is made of peer group discussion and other non-traditional teaching techniques. All students must take and pass a Proficiency Examination at the end of CM 104 and CM 115.

CM-106. Introduction to English Composition. 3 Credits.

Instruction and practice in writing English prose, with special emphasis upon individual development. The course progresses from personal experience to critical writing and research, and includes instruction in English grammar, spelling, and sentence structure. Special use is made of peer group discussion and other non traditional teaching techniques. All students must take and pass a Proficiency Examination at the end of CM106 and CM117.

CM-115. Introduction to English Composition II. 3 Credits.

Instruction and practice in writing and reading English prose, with special emphasis upon individual development. The course progresses from personal experience to critical writing and research, and includes individual instruction and mandatory laboratory work (in CALL) in English grammar, spelling, and sentence structure. Special use is made of peer group discussion and other non-traditional teaching techniques. All students must take and pass a Proficiency Examination at the end of CM 104 and CM 115. Prerequisites: CM-104 OR CM-106.

CM-117. Introduction to English Composition II. 3 Credits.

Instruction and practice in writing English prose, with special emphasis upon individual development. The course progresses from personal experience to critical writing and research, and includes instruction in English grammar, spelling, and sentence structure. Special use is made of peer group discussion and other non traditional teaching techniques. All students must take and pass a Proficiency Examination at the end of CM106 and CM117. Prerequisites: CM-104 OR CM-106.

CM-120. English Composition. 3 Credits.

Instruction and practice in the art of writing expository prose and the methods of writing research papers. Readings in short prose pieces and essays by distinguished writers. All written work, including examinations, tests the students' ability to write clearly and with understanding on what they have read. Emphasis is on objectivity, accuracy, clarity of expression, logical organization, and the elimination of grammatical and mechanical errors.

CN Courses

CN-113. Elementary Mandarin Chinese I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the tones, pronunciation, characters and basic grammatical principles of Mandarin Chinese. Only for students with no previous Mandarin.

CN-114. Elementary Mandarin Chinese II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the tones, pronunciation, characters and basic grammatical principles of Mandarin Chinese. Only for students with no previous Mandarin. Prerequisites: AN-113 OR CN-113.

CN-133. Intermediate Mandarin Chinese I. 3 Credits.

Continued study of tones, pronunciation, vocabulary, and essential grammatical structures aimed at improving competence in the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisites: AN-114 OR CN-114 OR 1 YEAR HIGH SCHOOL MANDARIN.

CS Courses

CS-150. Introduction to Computers and Information Processing. 3 Credits.

Study of computer systems including programming, hardware, software, information processing using business and scientific applications, robotics, and security. Emphasis on the theoretical as well as research and development aspects of computers. Students will work on assignments/projects aligned with their major and will develop web pages.

CS-177. Introduction to Computer Science. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to computer science in the context of scientific, engineering, and commercial applications. The goal of the course is to teach basic principles and at the same time prepare students for a major in computer science. Topics include: The von Neumann architecture, algorithms, data structures, hardware and software, application systems, programming, cyber security, and data science.

CS-180. Introduction to Programming. 3 Credits.

This course will teach job-market driven programming languages. Students will construct web pages using HTML and JavaScript, then move to C++, and finally Python. By the end of the course students should understand the concepts, methodologies, and techniques used in programming, including compilation, testing, and debugging. Programming constructs include syntax, control statements, arrays, strings, objects, and event handlers.

CS-190. Secure Software Development. 3 Credits.

This is a programming course required for Cyber Security students. Students will learn how to write, test, and debug programs using secure programming techniques. They will learn how to identify key characteristics and design patterns for secure coding, and develop programs in a secure environment using the software development life cycle. Students demonstrate their knowledge through hands-on programs, exercises and case study assignments.

CS-205. Computer Science Workshop. 1 Credit.

A topic chosen by mutual agreement of the student and instructor will be the basis of the course and final project. Credit may be used in lieu of a natural science lab. Prerequisites: CS-180 AND CS-231 AND INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION.

CS-231. Software Engineering. 3 Credits.

This course will teach students how to develop a software system from scratch by guiding them through the development process and giving them the fundamental principles of system development with object oriented technology. It will also introduce students to software development methodology, project management, and systems analysis and design as a problem-solving activity. Students will work with C++ and Python using control structures, functions, return statements, reference, arrays, and pointers. Data will be read from text files and databases. Prerequisites: CS-180 OR IS-180 MA-105, MA-123 OR MA-143.

CS-237. Java Programming. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to Java, object-oriented techniques, and Java applets for the World Wide Web. Java applications are introduced prior to applets so a student has a more thorough understanding of the programming process. Java applications are built from the beginning rather than having the user manipulate pre-written objects. Pre-requisite: CS/IS-180 Prerequisites: CS-180 OR IS-180.

CS-260. Information Technology Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the assessment of ethical principles within the application of information technologies to produce and store data and disseminate and use information. It will define and discuss computer ethics within a historical, current and future perspective by dealing with ethical issues in the workplace, privacy and anonymity, property rights, professional responsibility and globalization from the viewpoint of the individual, business and government. Prerequisites: CS-150 OR CS-177 OR CS/IS-180 PL-101 OR TH-120.

CS-271. Decision Support Systems. 3 Credits.

Concepts of Decision Support Systems: Decision Support System technologies, operations research, systems analysis, decision analysis, DBMS, artificial intelligence. Decision Support System tools: data mining, data management, EXCEL. In-depth analysis of business applications, including ERP Systems, data warehouse systems and electronic commerce. Students will be required to complete a final project on designing a computer based decision support system. Prerequisites: CS-177 OR CS-180(12188) OR BA-151 OR BA-155.

CS-295. Co-Op. 1 Credit.

CS-317. C# Programming for Web-Based Application. 3 Credits.

The design and construction of Web-based applications using the C# programming language. Students will learn how to build, manage, and deploy a database driven Web site. Prerequisites: CS-180 OR IS-180.

CS-332. Advanced Computing. 3 Credits.

This course will build on the CS180 and CS231 sequence. It will teach advanced concepts in job-market driven programming languages like Python, C++, PHP, Ruby, and Perl, and include the study of Data Center and Cloud Computing technology. Students will learn advanced object-oriented concepts, linked-lists, queues, stacks, maps, string processing and be able to read data from SQL Server databases. Prerequisites: CS-231.

CS-339. Computer Architecture and Operating Systems. 3 Credits.

This course covers computer architecture and operating systems. From a computer architecture standpoint, we will study hardware components, gates/buses/memory, and their use in constructing adders, comparators and addressing schemes. We will also cover machine level representation of data, computer architecture and organization, assembly level machine organization, interfacing and communication, memory systems organization and architecture, functional organization, multiprocessing and alternative architectures, performance enhancements, and distributed architectures. From an operating systems standpoint, we will study privileged and non-privileged states, processes and threads (and their management), memory (real, virtual, and management), files systems, access controls (models and mechanisms), access control lists, virtualization/hypervisors, how does an OS protect itself from attack?, security design principles as applied to an OS, domain separation, process isolation, resource encapsulation, and least privilege. Prerequisites: CS-231 AND CS-332.

CS-355. Foundations of Programming Systems. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive overview of the design and implementation of modern programming systems. Programming languages and compiling techniques, operating systems, database structures, artificial intelligence, and knowledge based systems are studied. Prerequisites: CS-232.

CS-370. Data Structures. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with an understanding of the basic abstract data types, associated operations and applying them to solve problems. Topics include: strings, lists, vectors, arrays, heaps, queues, stacks, buffers, searching and sorting, trees, and data formats. Prerequisites: CS-332 MA-123 OR MA-143.

CS-415. Introduction to Parallel Robotics and Cell Phone Programming. 3 Credits.

Introduction to parallel programming in Ada and Java. Students will write programs for cell phones and intelligent devices such as a robot. Prerequisites: CS-231 OR CS-237.

CS-489. Network Technology, Protocols, and Defense. 3 Credits.

In this course we will provide students with an understanding of the components in a network environment, their roles, and communication methods and the techniques that can be taken to protect network and communication assets from cyber threats. Topics include: network architectures/infrastructure/services/protocols (TCP/IP - v4 and v6, DNS, HTTP, SSL, TLS), network address translation and sub-netting, network analysis/troubleshooting, network evolution (change management, BYOD), remote and distributed management, implementing IDS/IPS, firewalls and VPNs , honeypots and honeynets, network monitoring and traffic analysis, minimizing exposure (attack surface and vectors), network access control (internal and external), DMZs / proxy servers, network hardening, mission assurance, network policy development and enforcement, network operational procedures, and network attacks (e.g., session hijacking, man-in-the-middle). Prerequisites: IS-380.

CS-490. Independent Study in Computer Science. 3 Credits.

For the superior student to pursue, under faculty supervision, for research topics not covered in courses offered.

CS-495. Cryptology. 3 Credits.

This course gives a historical introduction to Cryptology, the science of secret codes. It begins with the oldest recorded codes, taken from hieroglyphic engravings, and ends with the encryption schemes used to maintain privacy during Internet credit card transactions. Since secret codes are based on mathematical ideas, each new kind of encryption method leads in this course to the study of new mathematical ideas and results. The first part of the course deals with permutation-based codes: substitutional ciphers, transpositional codes, and Vigenere ciphers. In the second part of the course, the subject moves to bit stream encryption methods. These inlcude block cipher schemes such as the Data Encryption Standard (DES). Public key encryption is the subject of the final part of the course. We learn the mathematical underpinnings of Diffie-Hellman key exchange, RSA and Knapsack codes. Software packages and tools will also be studied. Prerequisites: IS-381.

CS-496. Cybersecurity and Digital Forensics Lab. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with cyber security and digital forensics tools and the skills to apply forensics techniques throughout an investigation life cycle with a focus on complying with legal requirements. The course will accomplish its goals through lecture, classroom discussion, and a number of in-lab exercises and projects. Topics and assignments cover: network attacks, intrusion detection systems, digital forensics tools, legal compliance and applicable laws, affidavits , how to testify, case law, chain of custody procedures, digital investigations, E-discovery, authentication of evidence, metadata, root cause analysis, and using virtual machines for analysis. Prerequisites: IS-381 OR CS-495.

CS-499. Capstone for Computer Science. GPS Mapping - Credit.

The Capstone Course offers students the opportunity to integrate the knowledge acquired in preceding computer science and information system courses. Students work on projects specific to their Computer Science concentration. Team projects in software design, programming, and implementation will be assigned. Components that are emphasized include analysis and design, team dynamics, project management, documentation, verification and validation of implementation, and communication skill (oral and written). Final projects are to be evaluated by Department of Computer Science faculty. Students present their final projects. Example of project categories: -.

CU Courses

CU-101. Communication Basics. 3 Credits.

An entry level look at communication models and research. Students will think critically about verbal and non-verbal messages interpersonally and through media.

CU-102. Media Literacy. 3 Credits.

Developing an understanding of new and traditional media, how media products are constructed and how they construct our everyday reality in ways that are social, cultural, psychological and political, with strategies for integrating media literacy into educational programs.

CU-157. Introduction to Photography I. 3 Credits.

Beginning with basic camera operation, students learn the visual and technical elements that create a photograph. 35mm camera required. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-158. Introduction to Photography II. 3 Credits.

Directed toward developing a personal style of picture taking, this course includes dark-room experience in processing and printing black and white film. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120 AND AR-157.

CU-190. Introduction to Film. 3 Credits.

Screenings, reading and discussions are used to introduce students to the basic elements of film and to build an understanding of cinematic art, development, history and theory. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-202. Media Communications I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the study of media with a focus on the history of print, broadcasting, film, video games and the internet. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-203. Media Communications II. 3 Credits.

A survey of mass communication theories with a focus on how theories emerge from different historical eras and how such theories are still applicable to mass media events and industries. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120, CU-202.

CU-205. News Writing and Reporting. 3 Credits.

An introduction to journalism, including a survey of print media, and practice in interviewing, reporting, and writing hard news and news feature stories. Prerequisites: CM-115 OR CM-117 STUDENTS IN CM-120 MAY THIS COURSE.

CU-208. Broadcast Newsroom. 3 Credits.

A course on the practical skills of broadcast TV. Students will be introduced to TV news writing and productivity. They will learn to shoot and edit news stories for broadcast. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-210. Writer's Workshop. 3 Credits.

A review of the basic rules of grammar in English intended for students who have completed composition requirements and wish to become better communicators. Also intended to assist students who may enter areas of media requiring strong verbal skills, and editing abilities. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-214. Art Advertising and Design. 3 Credits.

Appreciation of the non-verbal communication of visual images: light, color, shape, line, texture, design principles, etc. Studies through projects creating effective advertising images.

CU-218. Media Business. 3 Credits.

An examination of media as a profit making industry. The roles of sales, advertising and investors are viewed, as are trends of corporate media and entrepreneurship. Public relations and ethics are introduced. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120 AND CU-202 OR CU-203.

CU-228. Asian Film. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the history of Asian film industries and landmark films. They will look at the major films and film makers of Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan and Korea, as well as the popularity of the anime phenomenon and Indian Bollywood films. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-232. Art and Desktop Publishing. 3 Credits.

Creation of a brochure, mailer, newsletter or magazine at home or in business. Use of current programs per business world standards. Emphasis on aesthetic concerns. Prerequisites: #1 COURSE FROM CM-115 CM-116 CM-117 CM-119 CM-120 HP-122.

CU-241. Advertising Management. 3 Credits.

This course covers the management issues in advertising. It focuses on the design and implementation of effective advertising as part of an integrated marketing communications program. Since most advertising decisions involve both the advertiser and an advertising agency, the advertiser is viewed in interaction with agency, creative, media, and research personnel. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-247. Marketing Communications and Branding. 3 Credits.

This course is designed as an exploration of the history, development and current strategies, tactics and technologies of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) and branding. Using major communication theories, students will explore integrating the practices of marketing, advertising, public relations, publicity, special events, promotions, and a variety of promotional activities in a changing world of new relationships with consumers and new media technologies. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-255. Ethics in Communications. 3 Credits.

This course considers both the rational basis for good human action and, in particular, the application of those principles to the personal and social dimensions of communication. Topics such as truth speaking, fairness in reporting, truth in advertising, selection of data, bias in professional judgment, and so forth, will be considered. Values course. Satisfies values, but not core elective requirements. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-256. The Horror Film. 3 Credits.

A look at the horror genre as a metaphorical representation of social anxieties. The course traces the roots of horror from early European cinema to modern times, looking at the landmark films and the important stars and film makers of the genre. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-260. Radio Station I. 3 Credits.

A course in the practical skills of radio broadcasting. It teaches the basics of using equipment to produce, edit and broadcast a radio program. Productions students create will be part of the new campus radio station's programming. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-261. Radio Station II. 3 Credits.

An advanced level radio course, building on the skills learned in CU-260. Students learn to polish their interviewing, writing and remote news gathering and production skills. Students expand their knowledge and skills in radio production and the management of a small radio station. They will produce talk programming with multiple guests, perfect interviewing skills and produce and edit shows about campus and off-campus events with remote recording equipment.

CU-265. Screenwriting. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce the fundamentals of writing for film and television. Students experience the same creative process as a professional screenwriter, moving through the various levels of a typical Hollywood "step" deal. During the first two weeks of class, the students conceive, plan, outline and "sell" their ideas for either a feature length film (75-120 minutes) or a television program (sit-com or drama series pilot). Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-275. Public Speaking Workshop. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the techniques of public speaking and intensive practice in giving information and persuasive speeches. Performance evaluations and specific recommendations for improvement. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-280. Mediated Comm in Organizations and Society. 3 Credits.

Examination of how new technologies are being used to organize work, facilitate organizational decision making, conduct personal relationships, create communities and manage everything from personal interaction to global business organizations. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 CM-120.

CU-282. The Science Fiction Film. 3 Credits.

A cultural history of the science fiction film genre. Through landmark films of the genre, students examine how the sci-fi film is a metaphorical reflection on the impact of relationship between society, science and technology. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-283. The Conspiracy Theory Film. 3 Credits.

The course looks at the themes of conspiracies and paranoia in film and popular culture. Students examine how social and political conflicts through the decades have created fears of large-scale corruption in organizations of power and how these fears were translated to the movie screen. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-285. Gender and Communication. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the field of study of communications and gender. The objective is the explanation, observation, discussion and understanding of a gender and how it affects communication at the personal, group, organization and societal levels and how gender id portrayed in our culture through digital technology and the mass media.

CU-293. Today's Film Scene. 3 Credits.

Students will meet in Manhattan to view and analyze contemporary films, often before they are released to the general public. At times the film makers are likely to participate. The course will give students a knowledge of the contemporary film scene as well as skills in film analysis. Prerequisites: CM-115, CM-117, OR CM-120.

CU-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

CU-300. Film Theory and Criticism. 3 Credits.

To develop an understanding of film and TV and the ability to write about them, students will be introduced to major theoretical and aesthetic approaches, including auteur theory, genre theory, semiotics and spectatorship. Prerequisites: CM-115, CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-304. Principles of Media Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

An overview of laws governing writing and reporting, from first amendment to libel, roles of journalists in criminal cases and the relationship between the press and government. Looks at where the law stops and ethical obligations begin. Prerequisites: CM-115 OR CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-307. Art Commerce and the Cultural Impact of Disney. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course will explore how one company, using branding, corporate synergy, and transmedia storytelling has had an impact on the global economy, social institutions, public spaces, culture & our private lives. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-308. Disney: Behind the Scenes. 3 Credits.

Students travel to Walt Disney World for classes in learning skills and strategies connected to communication, teamwork, effective problem-solving, and management decision-making. A behind-the-scene tour is included. After the trip, students attend follow-up seminars of projects and discussion. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120 MUST HAVE OVER 30 CREDITS.

CU-310. Advanced News Writing and Editing Workshop. 3 Credits.

Students build on expertise acquired in Cu205, developing skills further in newsgathering, editing, interviewing and layout. They will generate stories and complete assignments on deadline. Beat and specialized reporting, headline and feature writing, print vs. broadcast. Prerequisites: CU-205.

CU-315. Business and Professional Communication. 3 Credits.

How to communicate in various channels necessary for the efficient functioning of groups and organizations. This includes writing for all forms of print and online, as well as, understanding interpersonal interaction and group dynamics that support and promote effective teamwork. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-318. African-American Communication In American Culture. 3 Credits.

The communication styles of African-Americans have been integral in the creation of modern American culture. This course will trace the beginnings of this communication to its expression today in the United States. The evidence includes oral, visual, early written, and electronically mediated communication of African-Americans with specific examples in songs, dance, storytelling, and preaching artifacts, adornments and crafts pamphlets, slave narratives and journals and filmmakers, performers and composers. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-327. Digital and Social Media Marketing. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the current thinking, practice and developments in digital and social media marketing, including: Social media marketing for B2C, B2B, not-for-profits, Internet marketing, online PR and reputation management, and mobile marketing. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-340. Sportswriting. 3 Credits.

A study of the growth of this area of specialized journalism, including interviewing, reporting, and writing assignments for a variety of sports. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120, CU-205 OR JN-205.

CU-341. Art and Entertainment Journalism. 3 Credits.

An overview of an area of specialized journalism: Arts and Entertainment. A look at the history and current issues in the arts, from early 20th century tabloids to today's bloggers, copyright concerns and arts in the community. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120, CU-205 OR JN-205.

CU-350. Public Relations. 3 Credits.

Influencing public opinion is the major goal of public relations activities. This course examines the roles of opinion research, press agentry, product promotion, publicity, lobbying, public affairs, fund-raising and special events management in creating a favorable image for a client. Writing skills are emphasized. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-352. Conversations With Writers: Metro Seminar. 3 Credits.

A Metropolitan Seminar local travel course.: An introduction to the working habits and aesthetic ambitions of professional writers of books, screenplays, newspaper articles and other media content. Students will read writers' works, publicity and marketing material, then students will discuss the information with the authors in New York City.

CU-355. Video Journalism. 3 Credits.

A new form of journalism practiced today is on the web called video journalism. Students will investigate the format, producers and the future of this type of reporting. They will also take a close, critical look at its credibility. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-385. Multimedia Reporting. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the fastest growing segment of journalism, multimedia/online journalism. Students will learn the fundamentals of using digital audio, video and photo equipment, editing, participating in social networks and producing multimedia projects on the web. Class will also take a look at the financial and social impact of multimedia journalism. Prerequisites: CU-205 OR JN-205 CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-400. Research Writing. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the process of conducting various forms of quantitative and qualitative research related to the field of Communication. Students will develop and write an original research paper with the long term goal of presentation and/or publication. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120, CU-202 OR CU-203.

CU-410. Investigative Journalism and Advanced Features. 3 Credits.

The practical application of investigative and public affairs reporting skills. Students will complete a major investigative news piece and gather information from public records and interview sources. Prerequisites: CU-205.

CU-454. Black Films. 3 Credits.

A survey of 20th century film making by and about African-Americans. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

CU-495. Media Internship I. 3 Credits.

This course integrates study in a specialty area of media communications with a job experience in the field. Students will compare academic preparation to work place demands, and will think critically about choosing learning resources for the world of work. Prerequisites: CU-202, CU-203 OR CU-205.

CU-496. Media Internship II. 3 Credits.

This course integrates advanced study in a specialty area of media communications with a job experience in the field. Students are encouraged to think critically about media ethics and practice. Prerequisites: CU-202, CU-203 OR CU-205.

EA Courses

EA-032. Dynamics of College Reading. 3 Credits.

Using culturally and linguistically appropriate materials, students practice critical reading through a series of reading exercises that are designed to move from one level to the next smoothly. Discussions based on the readings of various novels are an integral part of the course. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary as well.

EA-041. English Fundamentals. 3 Credits.

EA-041 is a one-semester writing course designed for students who need extra assistance in their writing skills. Along with emphasizing the basic structure of an essay, the class will also give special attention to language acquisition. This course does not count towards graduation requirements. Prerequisites: EA-010L, EA-011L.

EC Courses

EC-101. Macroeconomic Principles. 3 Credits.

Definition of economics and its methodology. Scarcity and the resulting macroeconomic problems. Measurement and determination of the level of macroeconomic activity (size and components of GNP, full employment, growth); stabilization problems (unemployment and inflation) and policies.

EC-102. Microeconomic Principles. 3 Credits.

Scarcity and the resulting microeconomic problems. Demand and supply analysis and applications. Production and cost functions. Market structures, industry and firm conduct and performance. Resource markets. Prerequisites: EC-101.

EC-251. Intermediate Microeconomics. 3 Credits.

The fundamentals of microeconomic theory. Consumer demand theory including the classical utility and indifference curve approach to consumer equilibrium. Firm behavior under various types of market structures. General equilibrium. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

EC-252. Intermediate Macroeconomics. 3 Credits.

Models of national income determination. Inflation, unemployment, and the role of monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

EC-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

EC-300. Statistics for Business, Finance and Economics. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the use of statistics in describing and solving economic and business problems. Frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Basic probability theory and acceptance sampling. Confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing. Simple regression and correlation analysis. Prerequisites: # EC-101 EC-102 # MA-105 OR MA-123 # MA-106 OR MA-124.

EC-301. Mathematical Economics. 3 Credits.

The main applications of mathematics to economic concepts and problems. Maximization, minimization problems. Simultaneous equations, calculus, linear algebra. Prerequisites: EC-300.

EC-302. Elements of Econometrics. 3 Credits.

The application and limitation of statistical techniques in testing economic and finance theories: simple and multiple regression analysis, time series and cross section analysis, problems encountered in regression such as multicollinearity and serial correlation. Prerequisites: EC-300.

EC-303. Linear Programming for Economics. 3 Credits.

Algebraic and geometric prerequisites, the simplex method, transportation problems, network flows, application to industrial problems, and economic theory. Prerequisites: EC-301.

EC-324. Poverty and Inequality. 3 Credits.

Description and anaylsis of the causes, characteristics and consequences of poverty. Links between poverty and inequality. Measurement of the different dimensions of poverty and inequality. Comparative analysis of poverty and inequality across countries. Poverty reduction policies and strategies. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

EC-351. American Economic History. 3 Credits.

The formation and transformation of the American economy from colonial times to the present, with particular emphasis on the post-Civil War period. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102 OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.

EC-353. Labor Economics. 3 Credits.

Labor aspects as a factor of production. Concept and changing composition of the labor forces competing theories of wage determination employment insecurity institutional and political developments consequent upon the emergence of the labor force as a separate economic entity. Prerequisites: EC-102.

EC-355. Government and Business. 3 Credits.

The nature and scope of the government's antitrust and regulatory policies and the impact of those policies on business and industry. Topics include: the legal basis, limitations, instruments and targets of control benefits versus costs of regulation evaluation of relevant governmental agencies and bodies (FDA, EPA, FCC, SEC, etc.). Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

EC-356. Urban Economics. 3 Credits.

Inquiry into the growth and development of urban areas the location, form and structure of cities current urban problems and policies. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

EC-357. Economics of Human Resources. 3 Credits.

The economic dimensions of basic decisions made by individuals and families over their life cycles and the policy implications of those choices. Topics include: economic determinants of marriage, family size and migration labor supply and alternatives to working (public assistance or crime) investment in human capital (education, training, health) income inequality, poverty and discrimination. Prerequisites: EC-102.

EC-358. Public Finance. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the role of government in the economy. The efficiency and equity of government expenditures and tax programs. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

EC-450. International Trade. 3 Credits.

Trade theories: traditional and modern approaches. International resource allo-cation, trade flows, tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade, free-trade agreements, multinational corporations, location theory. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

EC-452. Economic Development. 3 Credits.

Measurement and income distribution - obstacles, constraints, factors, and theories of economic development. Aid, planning, and actual experiences. New consideration to the development process. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102 OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.

EC-454. Political Economics of Latin America. 3 Credits.

Survey of historical, cultural and political events. A contemporary study of economic development, debt crisis, trade, financial and stabilization policies. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

EC-494. Seminar: Unions and Collective Bargaining. 3 Credits.

The nature and economic significance of labor unions in the U.S. Topics include: the historical development of the American labor movement the structure of labor relations collective bargaining procedures and strategies the impact of unions on wages and working conditions. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

EC-496. Capstone Seminar. 3 Credits.

This capstone course ties together the various components in the Economic Major as well as prepares graduates for the next level. Students will develop a synthesis production. Should be taken last term senior year. Honors students are not required to take this course and non-honors students may count it as an upper-level elective. Prerequisites: EC-251 EC-252 EC-300.

ED Courses

ED-001. Reading Lab. 0 Credits.

ED-010. Dynamics of College Reading. 3 Credits.

A program of selected readings, vocabulary enrichment, and guided study which enables students to develop effective study and critical reading skills by introducing them to selected readings in diverse fields including their major.

ED-101. Dynamics of College Learning I. 3 Credits.

Using multiple interdisciplinary methods, students will become familiar with the University and develop skills they need to be successful in college. Transition course topics include: test-taking strategies, math, reading, writing, technology, and study skills.

ED-102. Dynamics of College Learning II. 1 Credit.

A multidisciplinary course for freshmen to assist in their development as responsible college students and to further their potential for academic success.

ED-103. Career Development. 1 Credit.

This course will provide you with the basics needed in your academic and career planning process. Through guided self-assessment, exploration, and career preparedness activity, students refine and identify potential career interests and understanding of how their major relates to various careers and professions. Students will gain exposure to identifying internships, resume writing, interviewing, networking and developing a personal brand. This course will put students on the road to career success.

ED-104. Experiential Learning. 1 Credit.

Lab for Trio students to guide students as they participate in a chosen experiential learning activity.

ED-160. Education and Schooling in a Multicultural Society. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to education in a diverse and multicultural world. Students learn about the teaching profession by focusing on career readiness and the historical and philosophical foundations of education in the U.S. and other parts of the world. There will be a focus on students with disabilities, and effective instruction. The course introduces students to lesson planning, the certification process, and required curriculum standards.

ED-170. Child and Adolescent Psychology. 3 Credits.

A study of the growth and development from birth to adolescence within the context of the school.

ED-201. Fundamentals of Speech. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on child development from birth to age eight. Students will learn about theories of child development and how cognitive and linguistic factors affect development and learning. Students will learn about learning styles and multiple intelligences.

ED-203. Educational Psychology. 3 Credits.

A study of the psychological backgrounds. Topics include: adolescent growth and development, individual differences, the learning process, motivation, the process of effective study, transfer of training, and measurement of intelligence.

ED-250. Educational Pedagogy of World Languages. 3 Credits.

Methods of foreign-language pedagogy, lesson planning, syllabi, classroom activities, and methods of evaluation. Taught in English; recommended for education majors and/or minors.

ED-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

ED-301. Test and Measurements. 3 Credits.

An overview of essential concepts and principles of classroom and school-wide formative and summative assessments in the elementary classroom. An examination of tests and trends in psychological, standardized, and achievement tests and the rationale and assumptions underlying these assessments. Consideration and evaluation of the types of tests commonly used such as state, local, and national assessments as well as discussion of the interpretation of the results.

ED-390. Innovative Projects in Education I. 3 Credits.

Special projects of merit under the direction of a mentor. Open to juniors and seniors only.

ED-391. Innovative Projects in Education II. 3 Credits.

Special projects of merit under the direction of a mentor. Open to juniors and seniors only.

ED-395. Special Topics in Education. 1 Credit.

Exploration of a selected topic in the field of education.

ED-397. Professional Assessment Strategies. 3 Credits.

Course would incorporate subject specific content and strategies for taking standardized assessments.

ED-399. Tutorial. 3 Credits.

ED-428. Literature, Culture and Society Issues of West Africa. 3 Credits.

A study of seminal texts representing the Malinke, Igbo, Ghanaian, Wolof, Bambara, and Senegalese peoples of West Africa.

ED-429. Southern African Literature. 3 Credits.

Students will study the literature and cultures of Southern Africa.

ED-490. Clinical Experience I. 1 Credit.

This course will provide clinical experience in an elementary, middle or secondary classroom setting and will provide students with the skills to become effective and caring teachers.

ED-491. Clinical Experience II. 2 Credits.

This course will allow students to use their knowledge of developmentally appropriate practices and the role that families and communities play in the development of children and adolescents. Students will be reflective practitioners as they work in the classroom to assess children's learning, incorporate effective classroom management plans and obtain resources for families, colleagues, and administrators. Prerequisites: ED-490.

ED-492. Clinical Practice I and Seminar in an Elementary, Middle or Secondary Setting. 3 Credits.

Clinical practice in an elementary, middle or secondary setting in order to provide students with the skills and disposition necessary to become effective elementary school teachers and develop relationships with school colleagues, families, and community. Students will provide learning activities that support cognitive, emotional, and social development. They will design learning experiences that support culturally responsive teaching, and plan and assess developmentally appropriate lessons and units.

ED-493. Practicum in Reading. 3 Credits.

A field experience designed to provide the opportunity for students to work with reading teachers in a classroom setting.

ED-494. Seminar of Education TPA. 3 Credits.

An indepth analysis of the requirements and implementation of ed.TPA Prerequisites: ED-491.

ED-495. Clinical Practice II and Seminar. 8 Credits.

Students plan and implement developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive curriculum in an elementary, middle or secondary classroom which demonstrates their knowledge of development and the role of the school community with regard to student's learning. Students implement the required State standards through an integrated curriculum. They use multiple strategies to assess learning and demonstrate effective classroom management.

ED-498. Education of the Disadvantaged Child. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the impact of discrimination, social conditions, and deprivation on the educational process, particularly in cities.

EE Courses

EE-202. Elementary Curriculum. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive overview of the total elementary school program as a vehicle for the education of the child in contemporary society. This course will focus on effective curriculum planning. Students will develop unit plans that integrate state standards, differentiated instructional strategies and meet the needs of students with diverse learning styles, disabilities and English Language Learners.

EE-204. Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School Using Technology. 3 Credits.

This course introduces future elementary school educators to traditional and technological materials and techniques of instruction appropriate to the teaching of spelling, handwriting, listening, and oral and written language skills in the elementary school. The course explores digital literacy in the classroom discussing technological topics such as classroom web page design, using Google Apps, podcasting, screencasting, digital storytelling, blogging, and using Twitter as well as other forms of social media in the elementary classroom. This course has been designated as Writing Intensive.

EE-206. Teaching Reading in the Elementary School. 3 Credits.

Instruction in modern techniques for teaching children to read. Group and individual approaches: phonetic, basic text, and experimental techniques. Study of literature appropriate to reading development, appreciation, and enjoyment.

EE-212. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School. 3 Credits.

Materials and techniques of teaching mathematics, with appropriate emphasis on the traditional and modern developments in the field. Class activities, teaching aids, planning and evaluation of mathematics learning.

EE-214. Teaching Science in the Elementary School Using Technology. 3 Credits.

Materials and techniques of teaching science with emphasis on the discovery approach to equip the child with basic science learning and to awaken a desire for further science study in elementary school. This course will engage students in hands-on activities supported by technology. Students will apply skills, concepts and principles that unite the science discipline into their lessons and unit plans.

EE-495. Student Teaching: Elementary. 8 Credits.

A supervised classroom teaching experience on the elementary level (K-8), including seminar meetings and conferences scheduled prior to and during the student-teaching term. Prerequisites: ED-490 ED-491.

EE-499. Student Teaching: Elementary. 6 Credits.

A supervised classroom teaching experience on the elementary level (K-8), including seminar meetings and conferences scheduled prior to and during the student-teaching term. Prerequisites: ED-490 ED-491.

EL Courses

EL-123. Forms of Literature: Poetry and Drama. 3 Credits.

Designed to initiate and develop understanding and appreciation of the nature, properties, and traditions of poetry and drama and to stimulate critical interest in these literary forms by establishing standards of judgment and evaluation. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

EL-134. Fiction. 3 Credits.

Designed to initiate and develop understanding and appreciation of the nature, properties, and traditions of prose fiction and to stimulate critical interest in this literary form by establishing standards of judgment and evaluation. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

EL-201. Survey of English Literature I. 3 Credits.

A study of major works in British literature from the Old English period to the late eighteenth century, with emphasis on literary forms, genres, and themes, as well as key linguistic, cultural, and historical contexts. Required of all English majors. Prerequisites: EL-123 AND EL-134.

EL-202. Survey of English Literature II. 3 Credits.

A study of major works of British literature from the Romantic Era to the present, focusing on thematic concerns and aesthetic innovations within British literary production in relation to the socio-historic development of the cultures of Great Britain and its Commonwealth. Required of all English majors. Prerequisites: EL-123 AND EL-134.

EL-254. Dramatic Writing Workshop. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basics of dramatic writing, this course is for students who wish to concentrate on developing scripts for the stage. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 CM-120.

EL-293. Today's Film Scene. 3 Credits.

Students will meet in Manhattan to view and analyze contemporary films, often before they are released to the general public. At times the film makers are likely to participate. The course will give students a knowledge of the contemporary film scene as well as skills in film analysis. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

EL-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

EL-304. Medieval English Literature. 3 Credits.

Survey of the Old English period (499-1066), covering selected prose and poetry, including Beowulf, and the Middle English period (1066-1485), surveying the works of Chaucer, Langland, the Gawain poet, Malory and others. (Group 1) Prerequisites: EL-123 OR EL-134.

EL-305. Chaucer. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and several of the minor poems. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 1).

EL-311. The Renaissance: Major Texts. 3 Credits.

Interpreting the term "texts" broadly (as any important intellectual or artistic productions emerging from the variously and often vaguely defined era called the Renaissance), this course examines crucial literary works-including Don Quixote, Hamlet, the sonnets of Petrarch, and Calderon's Life is a Dream-as well as important artists (Giotto, Michelangelo, Leonardo, and Raphael) and philosophers (Descartes and Pascal, among others) of the period. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 1).

EL-313. Renaissance Drama. 3 Credits.

A reading and analysis of a variety of Renaissance plays from England and the continent (including Spain, Italy and Portugal). Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 1).

EL-314. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. 3 Credits.

A study of important dramatists, from Marlowe to Ford, excluding Shakespeare. Revenge tragedies, history plays and city comedies are examined both as literature and as plays intended for performance. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 2).

EL-321. 17th Century English Literature. 3 Credits.

Prose and non-dramatic poetry from Donne to Milton. Students read, discuss, analyze and debate issues reflected in literature from a variety of genres and sources, ranging from religious meditations to secular poetry, political pamphlets and philosophical essays, considering the social and religious issues raging at that time and today. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 2).

EL-331. English Romanticism. 3 Credits.

An exploration of major trends in English Romanticism with particular attention to the question of why writers of this era had such an explosive effect on the course of English literature. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 3).

EL-334. Victorian Prose and Poetry. 3 Credits.

An exploration of significant trends in Victorian literature primarily through a study of the works of its major poets, essayists, and novelists. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 3).

EL-345. Gothic Literature. 3 Credits.

The Gothic mode in fiction has been popular for over two centuries. This course explores stories and novels, from The Castle of Otranto to The Exorcist, that reflect crucial elements of the genre. We will be reading all forms of the Gothic-supernatural, mechanical, and psychological. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134.

EL-348. American Literature to 1870. 3 Credits.

Two elements of the American Dream have been present from the very beginning-freedom and opportunity. We will explore the earliest treatments of those ideas and others in works from authors such as John Smith and Edgar Allan Poe. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 3).

EL-353. The American Short Story. 3 Credits.

A study of selected nineteenth and twentieth- century American short story masterpieces. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 4).

EL-354. American Drama. 3 Credits.

An exploration of works by important American playwrights-including O'Neill, Williams, Hansberry, Mamet, and Wilson-this course examines how plays present universal concerns of family, identity, and the search for meaning, as well as specifically American themes of race, class, and gender. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 4).

EL-356. Modern American Poetry. 3 Credits.

A study of the lives and works of selected American poets, including Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, T.S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, and Sylvia Plath. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 4).

EL-358. Contemporary Literature. 3 Credits.

This course examines writers-American, British, and Global-from the 1960's to the present with focus on both stylistic and social/political concerns. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 4).

EL-363. Modern British Novelists. 3 Credits.

Studying the work of modern and post-colonial writers like Conrad, Forster, Woolf, Mansfield, Amis, and Smith, this course examines topics such as colonialism and war, perspectives on ethnicity and gender, and the role of the artist's voice in society. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 4).

EL-368. Modern and Post-Modern Fiction. 3 Credits.

Through the study of writers such as Woolf, Kafka, Pynchon, DeLillo, and Marquez, this course examines the cultural and historical trends that gave rise to the literary responses know as modernism and post-modernism. We will look at upheavals of politics, class, and geography, revolutions of mind and culture, and breakthroughs in technology and artistic production that caused writers to confront old ideas in new ways, and to use their new manners of expression to impact how we see and value the world. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134 (GROUP 4).

EL-401. World Literature. 3 Credits.

Selected readings of important works from around the world (read in translation), principally from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134.

EL-403. Great Books. 3 Credits.

Designed to provide a background in intellectual history and provoke consideration of ethics and values, this course studies texts fundamental to the Western literary tradition and to a liberal education. Writers include Homer, Plato, St. Augustine, Machiavelli, Cervantes, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and Dostoevsky. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134.

EL-420. Contemporary Theatre. 3 Credits.

Appreciation of contemporary theatre through attendance of Broadway, Off-Broadway and Off-Off- Broadway theatre in New York City. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134.

EL-450. Capstone Seminar. 3 Credits.

A required seminar on a topic in English or American literature. As part of its content, the course will provide an introduction to literary theory and criticism applicable to the seminar's focus. Students will engage in extended research and write and present a capstone thesis. Prerequisites: EL-123 EL-134 (SENIORS ONLY).

EL-473. Shakespeare: From the Page to the Stage. 3 Credits.

Since Shakespeare's plays were intended to be performed live, not read in silence, we will both critically analyze a selection of his works and then bring the texts alive in performance, employing both original theatrical practices and modern acting techniques. (Group 2) Prerequisites: EL-123 EL-134.

EL-493. Film Noir: Dark Side of American Film. 3 Credits.

An introduction to this American Film genre with reference to its origins in European films and painting of the 1920's and 1930's, and in American hard-boiled detective fiction of the 1930's, as well as to its significance to the development of Hollywood and today's mass media. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134.

EL-499. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120;.

EP Courses

EP-201. Child Development in the Early Years. 3 Credits.

This course surveys and focuses on child growth and development from birth through early adolescence. Theory related to individual stages of growth and educational methods related to those stages are discussed. The psychological, physiological, and sociological aspects and impacts of growth and development are also covered. Prerequisites: ED-170.

EP-202. Developing Home, School, and Family Partnerships. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the role of the home, school and family in the development of and learning of young children. Students will examine the philosophical, historical, political, and social trends and ideologies that impact the care of young children. Students will develop an understanding of diverse family units and identify resources to address their needs.

EP-301. Introduction to Special Education. 3 Credits.

This course will provide an overview and introduction to educational disabilities, special education laws, and the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) planning process. Characteristics and prevalence of a wide range of disabilities will be explored. Students will consider contemporary instructional approaches used for specialized populations.

EP-302. Fundamentals of Methodology, Curriculum, and Assessment in the Elementary/Early Childhood Classroom. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on implementing developmentally appropriate teaching practices, classroom management techniques, successful motivational strategies, objectives, lesson plans, and innovative methods. In addition, students will be provided situations to assess professional goals, develop authentic assessment practices, and respond to the cultural, linguistic, and learning needs of all students.

EP-490. Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Settings. 1 Credit.

This course will provide clinical experiences in an elementary or early childhood settings and will provide students with the skills to become effective and caring teachers. (Sophomore year) 50 hours.

EP-491. Clinical Experience II: Inclusive Early Childhood and Elementary Settings. 2 Credits.

This course will allow students to use their knowledge of developmentally appropriate practices and the role that families and communities play in the development of children. Students will be reflective practitioners as they work in the classroom to assess children's learning, incorporate effective classroom management plan and obtain resources for families, colleagues and administrators. (Junior year) 75 hours.

EP-492. Clinical Practice I and Seminar in an Inclusive Early Childhood Setting. 3 Credits.

Clinical practice in an early childhood or elementary setting in order to provide students with the skills and dispositions necessary to become effective early childhood teachers and develop relationships with school colleagues, families and community. Students will provide learning activities that support cognitive, emotional and social development. They will design learning experiences that support culturally responsive teaching, plan and assess developmentally appropriate lessons and units. (100 hours).

EP-495. Clinical Practice II and Seminar in an Inclusive Early Childhood Setting. 8 Credits.

Students plan and implement developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive curriculum in an early childhood/elementary classroom which demonstrates their knowledge of child development and the role of the school community with regard to children's learning. Students implement the Core Curriculum Content Standard through an integrated curriculum. They use multiple strategies to assess learning and demonstrate effective classroom management. (450 hours).

ES Courses

ES-190. Introduction to Environmental Science. 3 Credits.

This course examines how ecosystems function with an emphasis on the interactions between biological organisms and their physical environment and the chemical processes that govern these interactions. The impact of human populations on natural ecosystems is studied in detail using case studies from history and current events. Prerequisites: BI-184, BI-186.

ES-251. Geographic Information System. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the computer-based concepts and skills of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Basic GIS concepts, such as map characteristics and projections, spatial data models and analysis and relational databases will be covered. Hands-on experience with ArcGIS software is provided. Students will be exposed to methods of processing both vector and raster data using ArcGIS software. Prerequisites: ES-190, MA-134.

ES-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

EV Courses

EV-100. Introduction to Environmental Studies. 3 Credits.

An introduction to issues such as global climate change, use of natural resources, population issues, impact of political and economic decisions; decision-making considerations; evaluating arguments.

EV-125. Environmental Chemistry I. 4 Credits.

Laboratory/lecture course introducing the chemical principles underlying environmental issues. The class meetings and one four-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: MA-106 OR MA-133.

EV-126. Environmental Chemistry II. 4 Credits.

Laboratory/lecture course introducing the chemical principles underlying environmental issues. The class meetings and one four-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: EV-125.

EV-155. Introduction to Environmental Politics. 3 Credits.

This course will explore how environmental issues - such as climate change, resource extraction and energy use - are shaped by politics and political systems at the international, domestic and local levels. We will also examine the ways in which environmental issues have shaped politics - with concepts such as sustainable development and environmental justice - since the emergence of the environmental movement.

EV-200. Economics of Environmental Decisions. 3 Credits.

Evaluate the economics impact and feasibility of environmental decisions on individuals, governments and industry. Prerequisites: EC-100 EV-100.

EV-221. Surveillance in the Cybercity. 3 Credits.

Smartphones, debit cards, social networking sites, transportation systems, and public spaces increasingly produce troves of data about everyday life. This data is used by governments, corporations, educational institutions, activist organizations, and everyday people. This course critically analyzes forms of urban surveillance so as to reconsider personal and collective rights to privacy, property, and security within the contemporary cybercity. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

EV-253. Environmental Art and Issues. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to look at environmental issues through the interpretations of an artistic venue. We will explore how interdisciplinary environmental discussions within academic and activist communities can inform the artist and their work as well as society at large. The structure of the class will include research in topics such as eco-ethics, animal rights, environmental justice, ?green? consumerism, and eco-activism. The work created in the class, be it visual or written, will be presented to the college in a gallery space, website and/or through a public dialogue on campus for Saint Peter?s College students and the community at large. The course is geared toward a range of disciplines within and outside the arts inviting a wide range of students to take this course.

EV-327. Environmental Politics and Policies. 3 Credits.

This course explores the shifting political forces that determine environmental policies. Included is an examination of pressures, interest groups, and the media. Prerequisites: EV-100.

EV-486. Seminar: Genocide. 3 Credits.

After a thorough conceptualization of genocide, the course will examine case studies of modern genocide, ranging from the 20th and 21st centuries.

FN Courses

FN-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

FN-302. Elements of Econometrics. 3 Credits.

The application and limitation of statistical techniques in testing economic and finance theories: simple and multiple regression analysis, time series and cross section analysis, problems encountered in regression such as multicollinearity and serial correlation. Prerequisites: EC-300.

FN-401. Introduction to Corporate Finance. 3 Credits.

Provides the foundation for courses in finance . Topics include: Agency relationship Financial statement analysis discounted cash flow and securities valuation, concepts of risk and return and the capital asset pricing model. Cannot be taken by anyone who has taken FN 410. Prerequisites: EC-101, EC-102, MA-105 OR MA-123, MA-106 OR MA-124.

FN-410. Business Finance. 3 Credits.

Provides the analytical foundation for applied courses in finance, investments, and financial institutions. Topics include: discounted cash flow analysis theory of valuation for corporate securities concepts of risk and rate of return the capital asset pricing model financial forecasting working capital policy. Prerequisites: AC-331 AC-332.

FN-411. Financial Management. 3 Credits.

Builds on the conceptual framework developed in Ec410. Topics include: capital budgeting cost of capital, leverage and dividend policy long-term financing decisions involving common stock financing, long-term debt, and corporate restructuring. Prerequisites: FN-401 OR FN-410.

FN-412. Investment Analysis. 3 Credits.

Survey of the operations of securities markets the analytical methods and theory underlying the appraisal of corporate stocks and bonds and portfolio selection. Prerequisites: FN-401 OR FN-410.

FN-415. International Finance. 3 Credits.

Analysis of foreign exchange and foreign exchange markets, balance of payment, disequilibrium and adjustment, exchange risk management and investment decisions. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

FN-416. Ethics in Financial Professions. 3 Credits.

This course allows students to study systematically situations in finance professions that present ethical issues, focusing on the application of ethical principles to possible conflicts between parties in occupations in which finance professionals work. This course enables students to investigate issues of value in a reasoned and coherent manner in economics and finance. As such, it fulfills the core curriculum requirement for a values course. Prerequisites: EC-101 AND EC-102.

FN-417. Financial Statement Analysis. 3 Credits.

Covers the application of analytical tools to general purpose finance statements necessary to evaluate the financial condition of the firm and evaluate the future prospects of the company. The "analyst" can be any of several interested groups: investors, creditors, or other stakeholders such as employees, customers, suppliers and government. Prerequisites: FN-401, AC-151 AND AC-152 RECOMMENDED OR FN-410.

FN-420. Money Credit and Banking. 3 Credits.

Analysis of money and banking system. The impact of deregulation and the changing nature of the financial system in a domestic and international setting. The structure and role of the Federal Reserve system. Keynesian, monetarist and rational expectations views on money and economic activity. Prerequisites: EC-101 EC-102.

FN-490. Current Problems in Finance and Economics. 3 Credits.

This course examines recent developments in financial markets and practices, such as the growth of private equity and prevalence of stock buybacks. Special attention is paid to the economic consequences of these developments, with effect of finance on industry the main concern. Prerequisites: EC-101 AND EC-102.

FN-493. Seminar: Macroeconomic Policy. 3 Credits.

Case-study approach to U.S. financial and macroeconomic problems and policies, especially issues in monetary policy, and their international repercussions. The interplay of political institutions and market forces in the shaping of policies toward financial markets and institutions. Prerequisites: EC-101 AND EC-102.

FR Courses

FR-113. Elementary French I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the pronunciation and basic grammatical principles of French. Only for students with no previous French.

FR-114. Elementary French II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the pronunciation and basic grammatical principles of French. Only for students with no previous French. Prerequisites: FR-113.

FR-133. Intermediate French I. 3 Credits.

Presentation of advanced grammar and vocabulary for improved listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing. Practical use of French through dictation, oral and written exercises, sight-reading, and guided conversation. Prerequisites: FR-114 OR 1-2 YEARS HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH.

FR-134. Intermediate French II. 3 Credits.

Presentation of advanced grammar and vocabulary for improved listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing. Practical use of French through dictation, oral and written exercises, sight-reading, and guided conversation. Prerequisites: FR-133 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

FR-141. Advanced Composition and Conversation I. 3 Credits.

Refinement of composition skills nuances of grammatical usage vocabulary building intensive practice in French conversation. Prerequisites: FR-134 OR 3-4 YEARS HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

FR-142. Advanced Composition and Conversation II. 3 Credits.

Refinement of composition skills nuances of grammatical usage vocabulary building intensive practice in French conversation. Prerequisites: FR-141.

FR-248. French Conversation I. 3 Credits.

Daily practice in speaking French with special attention given to pronunciation, vocabulary development, and review of essential grammatical points. Prerequisites: FR-134 OR 1-2 YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH.

FR-249. French Conversation II. 3 Credits.

Daily practice in speaking French with special attention given to pronunciation, vocabulary development, and review of essential grammatical points. Prerequisites: FR-248.

FR-250. French Civilization and Culture I. 3 Credits.

Transition from the country to the city Paris as the capital of culture recommended for French majors and for those with general interest in French culture. Prerequisites: FR-134.

FR-251. French Civilization and Culture II. 3 Credits.

Transition from the country to the city Paris as the capital of culture recommended for French majors and for those with general interest in French culture. Prerequisites: FR-250.

FR-260. French Theater: 17th Century. 3 Credits.

Theater of the Age of Louis XIV. Moliere, Corneille, Racine Classicism and the Picaresque from the comedy of manners to French classical tragedy. Prerequisites: FR-134.

FR-264. Twentieth Century French Literature. 3 Credits.

France as the fountainhead and arbiter of major intellectual, artistic and literary currents of Modern Age: Symbolism, Surrealism, Dadaism, Existentialism and all the "Modernisms". Prerequisites: FR-134 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

FR-270. Contemporary Francophone Culture. 3 Credits.

Improvement of basic language skills in French through the study of contemporary Francophone music and film. Prerequisites: FR-134 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

GK Courses

GK-222. Intermediate Greek II. 3 Credits.

Further study of all forms and syntax of the ancient Greek language. Prerequisites: GK-221.

GM Courses

GM-113. Elementary German I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the pronunciation and basic grammatical principles of German. Only for students with no previous German.

GM-114. Elementary German II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the pronunciation and basic grammatical principles of German. Only for students with no previous German. Prerequisites: GM-113.

HE Courses

HE-122. Nutrition in Health and Disease. 3 Credits.

This course will explore a wealth of current information surrounding optimal nutrition and its association with disease prevention. Students will learn how to develop and implement a personal diet plan utilizing relevant nutritional recommendations and research for the enhancement of health and well-being.

HE-150. Physiology of Exercise and Healthy Aging. 3 Credits.

The investigation of the physiological age-related changes that occur in the later stages of life with a special emphasis on the necessary adaptations to exercise and nutrition.

HE-200. Complementary Therapies for Optimal Health, Wellness and Cognition. 3 Credits.

The course will cover the depth and breadth of research-supported information on optimizing health, well-being, cognition and quality of life through complementary therapies. We will cover the implementation of these complementary therapies in the business environment, education environment, mental health environment, and through the exercise science platform. Some of the modalities covered and practiced in this course include meditation, yoga, Tai Chi, mindfulness based stress reduction, stress management coping strategies, and age-related coping strategies for a lifetime.

HE-271. Concepts of Public Health. 3 Credits.

Introduction to Public Health Issues - public health laws, policy cycle, demographics, and epidemiological concepts and applications.

HE-295. Co-Operative Education. 3 Credits.

Co-operative education experience.

HE-301. Technology in Health and Fitness. 3 Credits.

This class is a comprehensive introduction to technology in the physical education classroom, and health and fitness and sport-oriented facilities. It explores developmentally appropriate usage of educational technology in the home, school, and workplace as it relates to the development and maintenance of optimal health and fitness. Emphasis is on computer and Internet technologies. The course includes hands-on computer techniques, critical analysis of National Technology Standards, practical experience with curriculum design, and technology-driven exercise prescription. Prerequisites: PE-103.

HE-350. Human Sexuality in Health Education. 3 Credits.

An overview of human sexuality and behavior with special emphasis on health education.

HE-486. Current Issues in Health Education. 3 Credits.

To study relevant current health issues such as obesity, unhealthy dietary problems, apnea, tobacco use, alcohol, drugs, heart disease and cancer.

HE-498. Internship in Health and Physical Education. 3 Credits.

Field Work experience in the areas of health and physical education.

HE-499. Internship. 3 Credits.

Field work experience in the areas of Sports Management and/or Health & Physical Education.

HM Courses

HM-210. Healthcare Issues and Organization. 3 Credits.

An introduction to current health care issues including telemedicine as well as political and pluralistic factors impacting healthcare are explored. Overview of types of healthcare systems and organizations including non-profit and proprietary institutions is addressed.

HM-310. Budgeting and Financing in the Healthcare Industry. 3 Credits.

Strategic planning, system integration, budgeting and financing, reimbursement systems, managed care, supply chain management and coding are explained. Prerequisites: HM-210.

HM-380. Legal and Ethical Aspects of Healthcare Management. 3 Credits.

Exploration of the legal and ethical aspects of healthcare. Ethical decision making and its application to health care issues is stressed. Concepts including healthcare regulatory bodies/accreditation, privacy, medical information management, access to care, contracts as well as malpractice and insurance liability are addressed. Prerequisites: HM-210.

HM-480. Advanced Concepts in Healthcare Management and Marketing. 3 Credits.

Application of marketing concepts for the healthcare industry, quality control indicators, health system/physician relationships, integrative healthcare, and recruitment and appraisal issues in healthcare organizations are examined. Prerequisites: HM-210 HM-310.

HP Courses

HP-390. Honors Thesis: Method of Research. 3 Credits.

The Honors Thesis: Research course prepares the student for the completion of the Thesis project. This course is to be taken in the second semester of the student's junior year. During this part of the project the student will engage in research under the direction of a faculty mentor. The arrangement with the mentor must be made prior to enrolling in the course. Both Hp390 and Hp492 are intended to facilitate the student's timely completion of the thesis project. A student may, however, choose to substitute an appropriate research course in their major department for Hp390. Any substitutions must be approved by the Director.

HP-492. Honors Thesis: Independent Study. 3 Credits.

An intensive original research project under the direction of an academic mentor and culminating in a formal paper. The written thesis must be completed no later than the Fall semester of Senior year. The project is to be followed by an oral defense in the Spring semester. Both Hp390 and Hp492 are intended to facilitate the student's timely completion of the thesis project. Hp492 and its oral defense is required of all students who wish to graduate in the Honors Program.

HS Courses

HS-121. The Western Tradition. 3 Credits.

An examination of the origins of early modern history with a special focus on Western civilization.

HS-122. World Perspectives in History. 3 Credits.

A chronological continuation of Hs121 with a greater emphasis on global developments. Prerequisites: HS-121.

HS-123. Special Topics in History. 3 Credits.

An examination of various topics which have significantly impacted the history of the world from the eighteenth century to the present. Prerequisites: HS-121.

HS-221. Twentieth Century Europe. 3 Credits.

Europe in the twentieth century was supposed to represent progress and the height of civilization. Two world wars, communism and the Holocaust suggested otherwise. This course explores the sharp contrasts between their ideas of Europe.

HS-222. Ancient Civilizations. 3 Credits.

This course traces the rise of ancient civilizations from their earliest roots to the early modern era. It places these civilizations in their global contexts and uses archeology, anthropology, and other methods to compare and study them.

HS-231. Main Currents in American History I. 3 Credits.

The formation of the American Republic from colonial times to the present. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-232. Main Currents in American History II. 3 Credits.

The formation of the American Republic from colonial times to the present. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-251. The American City Through the Wire. 3 Credits.

Very few television shows have captured the realities of the American city and the imaginations of the American public more than the Wire. More than a crime drama, the Wire reminds the viewer that all the pieces matter, as each of the five seasons focuses on a particular facet of the city: the illicit drug trade, working class employment, municipal government and bureaucracy, children and the education system, and the print news media. Using the Wire as the primary text, this course will look at the history of American cities, paying close attention to each season's theme.

HS-307. Women in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the roles of women in pre- modern times, discussing the theological and social attitudes that often hindered their advancement and the accomplishments they achieved nevertheless in politics, society, and culture. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-308. Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

This course studies the indigenous and imperial cultures of Africa since 1800 with emphasis on Anglophone and Francophone regions. Prerequisites: HS-121 HS-122.

HS-309. Renaissance and Reformation Europe. 3 Credits.

A study of the forces which produced change and crises in Europe from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century. Pre-modern World History. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-314. The World Wars. 3 Credits.

A study of World War I and World War II focusing on their causes and effects, their military and home fronts, and the interrelationships of the two conflicts. Prerequisites: HS-121, HS-122.

HS-339. History of Germany 1815-1945. 3 Credits.

A survey of German history from the Napoleonic Era to the collapse of the Nazi regime. Modern Western History. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-342. Britain in the 20th Century. 3 Credits.

The evolution of socialism and the transformation of the empire from 1870 to the present. Modern Western History. Prerequisites: HS-121 HS-122.

HS-343. Rise and Fall of British Empire. 3 Credits.

Development and disintegration of British naval and colonial power from the pirates of Elizabeth I to the pilots of Elizabeth II. Modern Western History. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-360. History of Russia 1613-1917. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and cultural history of Russia from the Time of Troubles to the Bolshevik Revolution. Modern Western History. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-361. The Soviet Empire. 3 Credits.

Internal change and development of Russia in the Soviet period. Modern Western History. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122, OR HS-123.

HS-383. Bearing Witness to War and Genocide. 3 Credits.

This course considers the history and interpretation of violence, destruction, ethnic cleansing, genocide and war what does it mean to bear witness? Prerequisites: HS-121 HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-438. Western Science and Occult. 3 Credits.

A look at astrology, alchemy, magic, and witchcraft from the ancient world to the Scientific Revolution, their place in the intellectual life, and how they were affected by new philosophical trends. Prerequisites: HS-121, HS-122.

HS-452. American Revolution and Federalist Era 1763-1800. 3 Credits.

A study of the causes, events and effects of this vital period in American history. Was it radical or conservative? Was it even a "revolution"? Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-453. Women in American History. 3 Credits.

This course will cover the history of American women from the colonies to second-wave feminism of the 1960s and 1970s and beyond. Prerequisites: HS-231 HS-232.

HS-459. The Era of the Civil War. 3 Credits.

A study of the period 1860-1865 with emphasis on the war itself and events leading to it. How did Americans end up killing one another on such a massive scale? The course will focus on the slavery debate, suffering, death, Lincoln, gender, black families, and the "fog of war." Prerequisites: HS-121 HS-122.

HS-464. History of Amercan Immigration. 3 Credits.

Examination of the migration of various peoples to the U.S., and the development of the policy on emigration from the progressive era to the present. United States History. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-466. The Long Civil Rights Movement in America. 3 Credits.

The campaign for civil rights in the broad context of 20th Century social movements, with particular emphasis on the African American struggle and how the work of individuals and organizations impacted American discourses on gender, labor, religion, sexuality and foreign policy.

HS-468. American Republic 1919-1945. 3 Credits.

The triumphs and travails of urban industrialism, with emphasis on the politics, economics, and social changes of the Depression, the New Deal, and World War II. United States History. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-469. American Republic Since 1945. 3 Credits.

An analysis of American society and institutions since World War II. United States History. Prerequisites: HS-121 HS-122.

HS-472. History of Latin American: Encounter to Present. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the social, cultural and political history of Latin America, from the eve of the fifteenth-century "Encounter" to the twentieth-century rise of neoliberalism and its malcontents. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

HS-473. Religion in the U.S.. 3 Credits.

Explores the hothouse of religious experimentation and debate that followed the Revolution and that continues to shape modern America. This course will span from early American Calvinism to antebellum Utopian movements, to the influx of Catholicism and other ethnic religions, to the rise of the Evangelical Right. Grace, Polygamy, Anti-Catholicism, Perfectionism, Creationism, Sin, Slavery, Darwin, Jerry Falwell, Abortion. This class will explore the strange contours of the most "religious" nation in the modern world. Prerequisites: HS-121 HS-122.

HS-477. End of Empire: Decolonization and Cold War. 3 Credits.

This course will use the theme of end of empire to provide insight into the history of the 20th century and the Cold War.

HS-499. The Tuleja Seminar. 3 Credits.

Named to honor Professor Emeritus Thaddeus V. Tuleja, the seminar stresses historical methodology as it relates to a particular historical topic chosen by the professor offering the seminar. Prerequisites: HS-121 AND HS-122 OR HS-123.

IS Courses

IS-180. Introduction to Programming. 3 Credits.

This course will teach job-market driven programming languages. Students will construct web pages using HTML and JavaScript, then move to C++, and finally Python. By the end of the course students should understand the concepts, methodologies, and techniques used in programming, including compilation, testing, and debugging. Programming constructs include syntax, control statements, arrays, strings, objects, and event handlers.

IS-235. Visual Basic. 3 Credits.

The design and construction of Windows-based applications using the Visual BASIC programming language. Design of GUI screens, writing code modules, drag and drop techniques, planning menus and dialogs. Prerequisites: CS-180 OR IS-180.

IS-251. Web Page Development. 3 Credits.

This course offers students a background to the World Wide Web, then takes them step-by-step through each of the stages of web site development using HTML and different Web development tools. Prerequisites: CS-150 OR CS-177 OR CS-180.

IS-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

IS-377. Linux. 3 Credits.

Installation, configuration, and administration of the Linux operating system and related programs. File, user account, process management, Shell (bash) and Perl programming will be studied.

IS-380. Database and Data Administration. 3 Credits.

This course teaches students how database systems are used and managed, and the issues associated with protecting associated data assets. In addition, it will teach the methods to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data throughout the data life cycle. Topics include: relational databases, no-SQL databases, object based vs. object oriented, big data, Hadoop / Mongo DB / HBASE, data policies/quality/ ownership/warehousing, long term archival, data validation, data security (access control, encryption), database vulnerabilities, database topics/issues (indexing, inference, aggregation, polyinstantiation), hashing and encryption, database access controls (DAC, MAC, RBAC, Clark-Wilson), information flow between databases/servers and applications, database security models, security issues of inference and aggregation, and common DBMS vulnerabilities. Prerequisites: CS-180 OR IS-180.

IS-381. Cyber Security Planning and Risk Management. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the ability to develop plans and processes for a holistic approach to cyber security for an organization. Topics include CBK, operational, tactical, strategic plans and management, security architecture, policies, standards, procedures, business continuity/disaster recovery, C-level functions, making cyber security a strategy (part of core organizational strategy), and change control. Prerequisites: CS-180 OR IS-180.

IS-410. Total Business Information Systems. 3 Credits.

In-depth analysis of business applications including enterprise resource planning and electronic commerce. Basic and advanced applications with emphasis on enterprise database management systems. Prerequisites: CS-231 OR IS-380.

IS-420. Info Technology Audit & Compliance. 3 Credits.

Information technology operations will be examined from the point of view of information systems and management in both standalone and global environments. Information technology audit programs for different computer environments and technologies will be studied and prepared. The COBIT framework will be introduced for auditing information technology operations. This course will also provide students with an understanding of the rules and regulations related to information technology audit and compliance with applicable laws and regulation such as: HIPAA, Sarbanes Oxley, FERPA, Data Breach Disclosure Laws, FISMA, Gramm Leach Bliley, and PCI DSS. Prerequisites: AC-151 OR IS-380 OR INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION.

IS-425. Disaster Recover and Business Continuity. 3 Credits.

In this course, students will learn to identify vulnerabilities and implement appropriate countermeasures to mitigate risks. Techniques will be taught for creating a continuity plan and methodology for building an infrastructure that supports its effective implementation. Throughout this course, practical skills will be acquired through a series of interactive workshops and case studies. Students design and develop a disaster recovery plan. Prerequisites: IS-380 OR IS-381.

IS-451. Advanced Web Page Development. 3 Credits.

Students will learn how to combine HTML, CSS and JavaScript to create dynamic and interactive Web Pages (DHTML). Students will design and implement Web Server applications in Perl/CGI, PHP, VBScript/ASP, Python, and XHTML. Prerequisites: CS-180 OR IS-251.

IS-455. E-Commerce Website Construction. 3 Credits.

Students will learn how to build, manage and deploy a database driven e-commerce website with a shopping cart and automatic order processing. Students will create a dynamic site which includes large and small images of products, calculation of invoice amounts, sales tax, shipping and payment methods. A final project is required. Prerequisites: IS-180 OR CS-180, IS-251 OR IS-451.

IS-490. Independent Study in Information Science. 3 Credits.

Under faculty supervision, independent study and research topics not covered in courses offered.

IT Courses

IT-113. Elementary Italian I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to spoken and written Italian stressing grammar and pronunciation.

IT-114. Elementary Italian II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to spoken and written Italian stressing grammar and pronunciation. Prerequisites: IT-113.

IT-127. Intensive Italian. 6 Credits.

An Intensive introduction to Italian which condenses two semesters of study into one. Fulfills language requirement in one semester.

IT-133. Intermediate Italian I. 3 Credits.

Presentation of advanced grammar and vocabulary for improved listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing. Practical use of Italian through dictation, oral and written exercises, Prerequisites: IT-114 OR 1-2 YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL ITALIAN.

IT-134. Intermediate Italian II. 3 Credits.

Presentation of advanced grammar and vocabulary for improved listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing. Practical use of Italian through dictation, oral and written exercises, sight-reading, and guided conversation. Prerequisites: IT-133.

IT-141. Italian Conversation I. 3 Credits.

Introduction to Italian conversation and review of Italian grammar. Prerequisites: IT-134 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

IT-142. Italian Conversation II. 3 Credits.

Introduction to Italian conversation and review of Italian grammar. Prerequisites: IT-141.

IT-246. Survey: Italian Literature II. 3 Credits.

Survey of Italian literature from the Renaissance to the present. Prerequisites: IT-245.

IT-252. The Italian Theater I. 3 Credits.

A study of the Italian theater from the Renaissance to the present. Prerequisites: IT-134 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

IT-253. The Italian Theater II. 3 Credits.

A study of the Italian theater from the Renaissance to the present. Prerequisites: IT-252.

IT-255. Modern Italian Literature II. 3 Credits.

A study of Italian literature focusing on the works of the best Italian writers of the 20th century. Prerequisites: IT-254.

JN Courses

JN-205. News Writing and Reporting. 3 Credits.

An introduction to journalism, including a survey of print media, and practice in interviewing, reporting, and writing hard news and news feature stories. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

JN-208. Broadcast Newsroom. 3 Credits.

A course on the practical skills of broadcast TV. Students will be introduced to TV news writing and productivity. They will learn to shoot and edit news stories for broadcast. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

JN-210. Writer's Workshop. 3 Credits.

A review of the basic rules of grammar in English intended for students who have completed composition requirements and wish to become better communicators. Also intended to assist students who may enter areas of media requiring strong verbal skills, and editing abilities. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

JN-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

JN-304. Principles of Media Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

An overview of laws governing writing and reporting, from first amendment to libel, roles of journalists in criminal cases and the relationship between the press and government. Looks at where the law stops and ethical obligations begin. Prerequisites: CU-205 CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

JN-310. Advanced News Writing and Editing Workshop. 3 Credits.

Students build on expertise acquired in Cu205, developing skills further in newsgathering, editing, interviewing and layout. They will generate stories and complete assignments on deadline. Beat and specialized reporting, headline and feature writing, print vs. broadcast. Prerequisites: CU-205 OR JN-205.

JN-340. Sportswriting. 3 Credits.

A study of the growth of this area of specialized journalism, including interviewing, reporting, and writing assignments for a variety of sports. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120 CU-205 OR JN-205.

JN-341. Art and Entertainment Journalism. 3 Credits.

An overview of an area of specialized journalism: Arts and Entertainment. A look at the history and current issues in the arts, from early 20th century tabloids to today's bloggers, copyright concerns and arts in the community. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120 CU-205 OR JN-205.

JN-355. Video Journalism. 3 Credits.

Students investigate the format, producers and the future of reporting on the web. Prerequisites: CU-205 OR JN-205 CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

JN-385. Multimedia Reporting. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the fastest growing segment of journalism, multimedia/online journalism. Students will learn the fundamentals of using digital audio, video and photo equipment, editing, participating in social networks and producing multimedia projects on the web. Class will also take a look at the financial and social impact of multimedia journalism. Prerequisites: CU-205 OR JN-205 CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120.

JN-410. Investigative Journalism and Advanced Features. 3 Credits.

The practical application of investigative and public affairs reporting skills. Students will complete a major investigative news piece and gather information from public records and interview sources. Prerequisites: CU-205 OR JN-205.

JP Courses

JP-130. Elementary Japanese I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basic language skills of speaking, reading, listening, and writing Japanese through a variety of media.

JP-131. Elementary Japanese II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basic language skills of speaking, reading, listening, and writing Japanese through a variety of media. Prerequisites: JP-130 OR AN-130.

LA Courses

LA-113. Elementary Latin I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Latin presented through exercises and brief literary selections.

LA-114. Elementary Latin II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Latin presented through exercises and brief literary selections. Prerequisites: LA-113.

LS Courses

LS-101. Introduction to Latin America and Latino Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the study of Latin America as a region-it's history, culture, politics and economic development- and Latino Studies, which examines the experiences of people of Latin American descent in the U. S.

LS-117. Spanish for Health Care Professions I. 3 Credits.

Grammar and vocabulary taught through dialogues and situations related to the healthcare professions.

LS-118. Spanish for Health Care Professions II. 3 Credits.

Further practice in grammar and vocabulary related to the healthcare professions. Prerequisites: SP-117.

LS-119. Spanish for Business and Finance I. 3 Credits.

Further study of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, writing, and vocabulary with an emphasis on business and financial usage.

LS-120. Spanish for Business and Finance II. 3 Credits.

Further study of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, writing, and vocabulary with an emphasis on business and financial usage. Prerequisites: LS-119.

LS-195. Spanish: Social Services I. 3 Credits.

Serves social workers, police officers, medical professionals, and those in related fields. Basic grammar structures and specialized vocabulary; writing exercises, conversation, and role play. Fulfills core language requirement.

LS-196. Spanish: Social Services II. 3 Credits.

Serves social workers, police officers, medical professionals, and those in related fields. Basic grammar structures and specialized vocabulary writing exercises, conversation, and role play. Fulfills core language requirement. Prerequisites: SP-195.

LS-198. Introduction to Hispanic Literature I. 3 Credits.

A basic introduction to the principal literary genres through readings in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134.

LS-199. Introduction to Hispanic Literature II. 3 Credits.

A continued introduction to the principal literary genres through readings in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-198.

LS-224. Black Hair and Identity in America. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the social, cultural and political significance of black hair in America. It will explore hair's profound impact on identity. Black hair is embedded in notions of race, ethnicity, gender and class. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151 OR LS-101.

LS-227. Sociology of Salsa. 3 Credits.

This course combines dance lessons with a sociological exploration of New York/New Jersey's salsa scene. Students will learn the fundamentals of salsa music and dance, with a focus on rhythm, timing, musicality and basic steps. Lessons are complemented by discussions and origins of the music as it relates to Latin American and Caribbean history and migration to the northeast. Finally, students will investigate the culture of socials, which are dance parties dedicated to learning and practicing the dance. Class meets two hours per week for lessons and requires a minimum of two additional hours per week of fieldwork TBA. Dance shoes or dance sneakers required.

LS-244. Hispanic-American Literature I. 3 Credits.

Origins and evolution of writings from Columbus to Vargas Llosa and his con temporaries. Required for Spanish majors and minors. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 SP-136 SP-199.

LS-249. Cultural Geography of Hispanic America. 3 Credits.

A study, through readings and video, of the history, culture, and societal aspects of the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR SP-199.

LS-250. Spanish Conversation I. 3 Credits.

Intensive practice in Spanish conversation through discussion of interesting topics, as well as review of critical grammatical structures and vocabulary to facilitate effective expression. Prerequisites: SP-134 SP-199.

LS-251. Spanish Conversation II. 3 Credits.

SP-250;.

LS-254. Sociology of Migration and Immigration. 3 Credits.

Immigration in history patterns of movement immigration and refugees adjustment and resettlement immigration law. The needs of immigratants housing, employment education, medical care. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

LS-265. Social Justice in Latin American Film. 3 Credits.

Analysis of film, viewed politically and socially, as a mediator of the dynamics of tradition and change in Latin America. Prerequisites: LS-101 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

LS-294. Business Writing in Spanish. 3 Credits.

Review of Spanish grammar and syntax through the study of various forms of business writing, including letters, memos, bills, order forms, receipts, resumes, and other forms of correspondence. Prerequisites: SP-114 OR 1-2 YEARS HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH.

LS-295. Cooperative Education. 3 Credits.

LS-310. Feminist Political Theory. 3 Credits.

Historical overview of feminist political activity in the United States and an analysis of feminist theory: liberal feminism, Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and post-modern feminism.

LS-351. Issues in the Latino Community. 3 Credits.

The Socio-economic and political origins of the various Hispanic peoples, with analysis of Social issue arising from Hispanic involvement in American Societal institutions, i.e. education, politics, family, etc. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151 OR LS-101.

LS-354. Minority Group Relations. 3 Credits.

A study of the history, conditions, and contributions of racial minority groups within the United States. Special emphasis on developments involving African Americans, Hispanics, and Asian Americans.

LS-359. Seminar: Literature of the Boom II. 3 Credits.

Continued analysis of the representative texts of the explosion of Hispanic-American literary production onto the world market, in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

LS-368. Health and Inequalities: Race, Class and Gender. 3 Credits.

This course critically examines the relationship between health status and social inequalities along the lines of race and ethnicity, social class and gender. We begin with an overview of epidemiology and the idea of studying health from a sociological perspective. We then consider the complex relationship between socio-economic status (class) and health statuses, followed by an examination of specific health issues for major racial/ethnic minorities and gender groups. We will try to understand how low socioeconomic status leads to poor health, how conscious, unconscious, and institutionalized racial/gender bias affects medical care and health outcomes, and address ideas for reducing health disparities among all groups. Prerequisites: SO-121.

LS-384. Cultural Anthropology. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the development of anthropology as an offshoot from Sociology an examination of the differences in the methodology of anthropology and Sociology in the study of a variety of cultures. Prerequisites: SO-121 PL-100 OR PL-101 OR TH-110 OR TH-120.

LS-389. Latina Research in Action. 3 Credits.

Students will learn about the theoretical underpinnings of participatory action research and will engage in existing or new participatory projects in education with Latina communities.

LS-392. Caribbean Literature. 3 Credits.

This course will explore aspects of Caribbean literature in Spanish from Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic. Readings will include essays, short stories, poems, and novels from the Encounter to the present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

LS-412. Ethnicity and Race in Urban History. 3 Credits.

Includes the African and European immigrant experiences in America, the effects of slavery and urbanization, and the formation of class consciousness. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR LS-101, AND SO-280 AND SO-384.

LS-452. Economic Development. 3 Credits.

Measurement and income distribution - obstacles, constraints, factors, and theories of economic development. Aid, planning, and actual experiences. New consideration to the development process. Prerequisites: EC-101, EC-102.

LS-472. History of Latin America: Encounter to Present. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the social, cultural and political history of Latin America, from the eve of the fifteenth-century "Encounter" to the twentieth-century rise of neoliberalism and its malcontents.

LS-489. Globalization and Fieldwork Seminar. 3 Credits.

Short term study/travel course in which students conduct first hand investigations on the effects of globalization in relevant settings. Specific area and topics determined at the beginning of the Academic Year. Locations change every term. Prerequisites: SO-121 UR-151 PO-150.

LS-490. Seminar Don Quijote. 3 Credits.

Readings, research, and critical analysis of the Cervantes novel in its socio-historical context. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 SP-136 OR SP-199.

LS-493. Hispanic Heritage and Identity. 3 Credits.

This course will consider the heritage and identity of Hispanics in the U.S. today. By examining texts in English and Spanish, students will develop a sense of how U.S. Hispanics express their identity through literature. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 SP-136 OR SP-199.

LS-494. Hispanic Experience in the U. S.. 3 Credits.

Study of the heritage and identity of Hispanics in the U.S., especially as these are expressed in and through literary texts. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

LS-495. Internship in International Settings. 3 Credits.

Planned and supervised off-campus working experiences overseas or with international organizations integrated with independent academic study under the tutelage of the Director of International and intercultural Studies.

LS-496. Urban Internship. 3 Credits.

Advanced levels of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

LS-497. Advanced Urban Internship. 3 Credits.

Advanced levels of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

LW Courses

LW-155. Seminar in Contemporary Legal Issues. 3 Credits.

A course open to all students examining current legal issues in a seminar setting.This course will acquaint students with the issues that are at the forefront of the legal environment such as physician assisted suicide, legal issues relating to the world-wide web, capital punishment, drug laws and their enforcement, abortion and the law, affirmative action and race-conscious preferences, and sex offender notification laws.

LW-156. Legal Aspects of Health Care. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the legal aspects of health care, including general contracts, confidentiality of records, insurance liability, and malpractice.

MA Courses

MA-001. Introductory Algebra. 3 Credits.

Real numbers, variable expressions, solving equations, linear equations in two variables, systems of linear equations, inequalities. This is a preparation course for MA-102, MA-105, MA-106, and MA-101.

MA-101. Precalculus. 3 Credits.

Brief review of basic algebraic concepts; functions (general concepts, linear, quadratic); polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; summary of trigonometric functions; application problems.

MA-102. Mathematics for the Humanities I. 3 Credits.

Symbolic logic, number theory, functions, and other topics selected by the instructor.

MA-103. Mathematics for the Humanities II. 3 Credits.

Set theory, combinatorics, finite probability, conditional probability, and topology. Prerequisites: MA-102.

MA-105. Elementary Applied Mathematics. 3 Credits.

Introduction to ways in which everyday situations can be modeled and studied mathematically: networks, voting, coding, and finance.

MA-106. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. 3 Credits.

Describing data collections using measures (e.g., center and spread) and graphical representations (e.g., histograms and plots), estimating probabilities for discrete and continuous distributions, and making statistical inferences using selected approaches (e.g., confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear regression analysis).

MA-108. Mathematics for Educators I. 3 Credits.

In-depth study of the concepts that underlie the mathematics of the elementary school curriculum in the United States. Topics include set theory, numeration, mathematical thinking, number theory, and the four basic operations of mathematics. This course is intended for individuals who expect to teach in primary school.

MA-109. Mathematics for Educators II. 3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of MA-108. Topics in the second semester include the real number system, proportional reasoning, statistics, probability, and measurement systems. This course is intended for individuals who expect to teach in primary school. Prerequisites: MA-108.

MA-115. Mathematics for the Health Sciences. 3 Credits.

This course is designed for students in nursing, pre-health and allied-health fields so that they can master skills of basic math, use of measurement systems, and strategies of problem solving needed in the health-science courses. The Metric System of Measurement; Apothecaries' and Household Systems of Measurement; Calculations needed to determine dosages; Construction and Reading of Graphs; Introduction to Statistics including measures of central tendency and measures of dispersion.

MA-123. Elementary Calculus I. 3 Credits.

Differential calculus of polynomial and rational functions; applications of calculus to problems in business and economics.

MA-124. Elementary Calculus II. 3 Credits.

Exponential and logarithmic functions, integral calculus, differential equations applications to problems in business and economics. Prerequisites: MA-123.

MA-125. Intermediate Calculus. 2 Credits.

This course is intended for students (e.g., computer science majors) who have completed 6 credits of calculus and who now wish to take Multivariable Calculus. Prerequisites: MA-124.

MA-132. Statistics for Life Sciences. 3 Credits.

Basic methods of data analysis. Topics include displaying data graphically; measures of central tendency and variability; probability concepts; normal, t, chi-square, and F distributions; confidence intervals and estimation; hypothesis testing; regression and correlation analysis; analysis of variance; contingency tables; use of statistical software. Biological applications are emphasized.

MA-133. Calculus for the Life Sciences. 4 Credits.

Polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions; limits, continuity, derivatives; graphs, maximum-minimum problems; exponential and logarithmic functions, growth and decay problems integrals, basic integration techniques, applications of the integral. Biological applications are emphasized.

MA-143. Differential Calculus. 4 Credits.

Limits and continuity; the derivative; chain rule and differentiation of algebraic functions; extrema; applications; the Mean Value Theorem.

MA-144. Integral Calculus. 4 Credits.

The definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem of the Calculus applications transcendental functions methods of integration. Prerequisites: MA-143.

MA-212. Elementary Statistics. 3 Credits.

Descriptive statistics, laws of probability, some standard probability functions, central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: MA-106 OR MA-115 OR MA-124 OR MA-133 OR MA-144 OR MA-273 OR INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION.

MA-214. Mathematics of Finance. 3 Credits.

Interest, partial payment, ordinary annuities, depreciation, amortization, sinking funds bonds, deferred annuities, perpetuities probability, mortality tables, life annuities, life insurance. Prerequisites: MA-106 OR MA-132 OR MA-212 OR MA-124 OR MA-133 OR MA-144 OR MA-273 OR INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION.

MA-216. Computer Mathematics. 3 Credits.

Number systems, internal representation, errors logic, Boolean algebra, circuits algorithms, efficiency counting, probability. Prerequisites: MA-106(9414)OR MA-132 OR MA-212 OR MA-124 OR MA-133 OR MA-144 OR MA-273 AND CS-180.

MA-218. Quantitative Methods for Business. 3 Credits.

Decision theory, trees, linear programming, simplex method, sensitivity analysis inventory theory, CPM, PERT. Prerequisites: MA-106(9414)OR MA-132 OR MA-212 OR MA-124 OR MA-133 OR MA-144 OR MA-273 OR INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION.

MA-222. Intermediate Statistics. 3 Credits.

This course extends the statistical data analysis introduced in MA-212. Students will explore additional topics in parametric and non-parametric methods, including analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple regression. Learner will also actively design statistical experiments and interpret data sets. Students will use statistical software and computer programming as tools to assist with data analysis. Prerequisites: MA-212 OR MA-132 OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.

MA-246. Discrete Mathematics. 3 Credits.

A study of the variety of finite mathematical structures and their applications. Logic and proofs, Boolean algebras and combinatorial circuits sets, relations, equivalence relations, and recurrence relations graphs, trees. Prerequisites: MA-144 OR MA-125.

MA-247. Introductory Linear Algebra. 3 Credits.

Matrix calculus vector spaces linear independence and bases linear transformations on vector spaces eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisites: MA-144 OR MA-125.

MA-248. Math Tech Lab. 1 Credit.

Software for numerical and symbolic computations (such as MatLab and Mathematica), and mathematical typesetting (such as TeX) Prerequisites: MA-144 OR MA-125 OR INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION.

MA-273. Multivariable Calculus I. 4 Credits.

Integration techniques, 2-and-3 dimensional vector geometry functions of several variables, limits, directional derivatives, partial differentiation, extrema double and Triple integrals. Prerequisites: MA-144 OR MA-125.

MA-274. Multivariable Calculus II. 4 Credits.

Limits and L'Hospital's Rule, improper integrals, infinite sequences and series power series, Taylor series, selected topics in multivariable calculus. Prerequisites: MA-273.

MA-302. Elementary Math Functions for Middle School. 3 Credits.

Functions and equations, arithmetic and geometric sequences, mathematical methods, linear functions, difference equations, quadratic and cubic functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, domain and range, fitting a line to data and modeling, and associated mathematical processes. Methods for learning and teaching the topics are addressed concurrently with the content.

MA-304. Statistics, Probability and Discrete Math for Middle School. 3 Credits.

Topics include collecting, summarizing, and interpreting data, sampling techniques, fundamental concepts of probability, counting techniques, Euler and Hamiltonian circuits, shortest distance algorithms, and associated mathematical processes. Methods for learning and teaching the topics are addressed concurrently with the content.

MA-306. Geometry for Middle School. 3 Credits.

Metric and US standard measurement, inductive and deductive reasoning, Euclidean geometry of two and three-dimensional figures including, but not limited to: area, perimeter, volume, surface area, congruency, similarity, rotation and transformation. Coordinate geometry, iteration and fractals, geometry in the world around us, and associated mathematical processes. Methods for learning and teaching the topics are addressed concurrently with the content.

MA-335. Probability Theory. 3 Credits.

Probability spaces, random variables, expectation, variance, standard deviation, binomial, multinomial, and Poisson distributions approximations by the normal distribution, Chebyshev's Inequality. Prerequisites: MA-273.

MA-336. Mathematical Statistics. 3 Credits.

Law of large numbers, Central Limit Theorem, estimation of parameters, confidence intervals, test of hypotheses, sampling, regression, analysis of variance. Prerequisites: MA-273 TAKING MA-335 AS A PRE-REQUISITE IS RECOMMENDED, THOUGH NOT REQUIRED.

MA-350. College Geometry. 3 Credits.

Study of Euclidean and other geometries from an axiomatic point of view. Prerequisites: MA-246.

MA-375. Advanced Calculus. 3 Credits.

Real numbers, sequences, limits of sequences and functions, continuity, differentiation, theory of integration, pointwise and uniform convergence. Prerequisites: MA-274.

MA-377. Ordinary Differential Equation. 3 Credits.

Existence and uniqueness of solutions, first and second order equations, systems of linear differential equations, solutions in power series applications. Prerequisites: MA-247 AND MA-274.

MA-379. Differential Equations for Engineers. 4 Credits.

This Course is an Expanded Version of MA-377 and includes the following additional topics: The Laplace Transform, Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Series. Prerequisites: MA-274 AND MA-247.

MA-382. Mathematical Modeling. 3 Credits.

The nature and philosophy of model building algebraic and analytic models in the social, physical, and life sciences. Prerequisites: MA-273 AND MA-247.

MA-385. Topics in Applied Mathematics. 3 Credits.

Topics vary by term. Prerequisites: MA-273 AND MA-247.

MA-387. Topics in Mathematics. 3 Credits.

Topics vary by term. Prerequisites: MA-273 AND MA-247.

MA-389. Topics in Statistics. 3 Credits.

Topics vary by term. Prerequisites: MA-336 OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.

MA-399. Tutorial. 3 Credits.

MA-441. Modern Algebra. 3 Credits.

Introduction to modern algebraic concepts theory of groups, rings, and fields. Prerequisites: MA-246 MA-247 SENIOR MATH MAJORS OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR. INSTRUCTOR CONSENT REQUIRED.

MA-481. Numerical Analysis. 3 Credits.

Use of the computer to solve numerical problems. Error analysis solutions of equations linear systems interpolation approximation integration. Prerequisites: MA-273 MA-247 CS-180.

MA-490. Senior Seminar in Mathematics. 3 Credits.

In this capstone course, graduating senior Mathematics majors will explore areas of mathematics that draw on many of the previous courses, emphasizing the connection between different areas of mathematics. This culminating academic experience for the major will include writing, presentations, and contemporary mathematics research. Prerequisites: MA-441 SENIOR MATHEMATICS MAJORS ONLY.

ML Courses

ML-110. American Sign Language I. 3 Credits.

This beginners' course develops expressive and receptive skills, vocabulary knowledge, and sensitivity to deaf culture. The history and social environment of the deaf community will be presented and discussed.

ML-125. Intensive American Sign Language. 6 Credits.

Intensive development of expressive and receptive skills, vocabulary, and sensitivity to deaf culture, and study of the history and social environment of the deaf community.

ML-258. The Baroque Aesthetic. 3 Credits.

Literature from the Age of Versailles, monarchy, and the Counter Reformation. Excerpts from French, Spanish, and Italian literary works of the Baroque.

ML-305. Romanticism. 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary study of the Romantic Movement based on reading of primary texts and critical evaluations. Taught in English; individual projects in target languages.

NS Courses

NS-320. Ethics and Responsibility in STEM Disciplines. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the ethical issues faced by researchers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. When faced with monetary, societal, political, environmental, and personal pressures, what choices should a researcher make? In this course we will examine choices made by actual STEM practitioners and consider the ethical issues involved. Ethical issues may include but are not limited to publication standards, intellectual property rights, whistleblowing, conflicts of interest, human and animal subjects, robots, diversity, and societal and environmental impacts. Historical cases may include but are not limited to cold fusion, HIV, the Challenger explosion, the Stanford prison experiment, and the Algebra Project. Prerequisites: 4 GROUPS # CM-115 CM-117 OR CM-120 # PL-101 OR TH-120 # BI-183 CH-131 PC-185 OR PS-151 # MA-123 MA-133 MA-143 MA-273 CS-180 IS-180 OR CS-231 OR INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION.

NU Courses

NU-202. Theorical Bases of Professional Nursing. 3 Credits.

The evolution of professional nursing is explored and the development of professional identity is facilitated by the introduction of values inherent to the discipline of nursing including social justice. Nursing theory, as well as other selected theories and concepts, are examined including: health belief model, teaching/learning theory, culture/global health, evidence-based practice and the nursing process. Prerequisites: BI-171, BI-172, ADMISSION TO NURSING MAJOR.

NU-204. Nutrition and Health. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the role of nutrition in health and healing. The study of essential nutrients and their function is emphasized. Meeting dietary requirements across the life span is explored. The impact of pluralistic and public health factors on dietary practices is discussed. Prerequisites: BI-171, BI-172.

NU-210. Pharmacology for Professional Nursing Practice. 3 Credits.

The focus of this course is on pharmacological therapy, major drug classifications, including prototypes, are addressed for each of the body systems. Nursing implications of safe drug administration as well as the pluralistic factors affecting medication therapy are stressed. Prerequisites: MA-115.

NU-250. Clinical Bases of Professional Nursing. 5 Credits.

Basic interpersonal and technical nursing skills utilized to provide care for well and ill individuals are introduced. Knowledge and skills required to assess, prioritize, plan, implement and evaluate health care are emphasized. Concepts related to nutrition and medication therapy are applied. Pluralistic as well as legal and ethical issues related to quality care are stressed. College laboratory and clinical experiences in selected health care settings. Prerequisites: MA-115, BI-161, PS-234.

NU-302. Seminar in Professional Nursing. 2 Credits.

The course is designed to examine the evolution of professional nursing through a synthesis of the social, cultural, philosophical, historical and theoretical influences. The development of a professional identity is facilitated by encouraging students to derive meaning from the core values central to the nature of nursing.

NU-303. Seminar in APA Writing for Health Science. 2 Credits.

A course to help the RN-BSN student learn APA writing style required for nursing and other health sciences.

NU-304. Pathophysiology. 3 Credits.

This course uses a systems approach to examine the human response patterns to health and illness. Physiological processes and pathological changes are explored in depth. Prerequisites: BI-161 AND BI-172.

NU-308. Health Assessment. 3 Credits.

The major focus of this course is on a holistic approach to health appraisal of the individual client. The nursing process, with an emphasis on assessment and planning is analyzed and applied in dealing with individuals in the college laboratory. Concepts related to health promotion, risk identification and client education are stressed. Prerequisites: FROM COURSES BI-172 PS-235 NU-250 NU-304.

NU-310. Health Assessment. 4 Credits.

Major focus is on a holistic approach to health appraisal of the individual client across the life span. The nursing process, with an emphasis on assessment and planning is analyzed and applied in dealing with individuals in the college laboratory. Concepts related to health promotion, risk identification and client education are stressed. Prerequisites: NU-302.

NU-312. Nursing Care for Adults and Aging I. 5 Credits.

Application of the nursing process in caring for adults and older clients with chronic health care needs. Normal aging and adaptations in self-care needed as a result of age related changes will be discussed. Pluralistic fators including nutrition and medication therapy are integrated. Legal and ethical issues are applied. College labortory and clinical experiences in selected health care settings.

NU-315. Nursing Care for Adults and Aging II. 5 Credits.

A continuation of the Nursing Care of Adults and Aging, I, this course builds and expands the knowledge and skill base related to caring for adults and older clients with acute and chronic health needs. Pathologic conditions associated with aging are discussed. Pluralistic factors indluding nutrition and medication therapy are integrated. Legal and ethical issues are applied. Clinical expriences in selected health care settings.

NU-325. Nursing Care for Child-Bearing Families. 5 Credits.

The use of the nursing process to provide care for child-bearing families is examined. Nursing care of clients during pregnancy, childbirth, the postpartum and newborn periods is stressed. Pluralistic factors as well as nutrition and medication therapy are integrated. Strategies to promote health and care for clients with psysiological and psychological alterations are discussed. Normal family functioning and the impact of pregnancy on the family is considered. College laboratory and clinical experiences in selected health care settings.

NU-330. Care of Families and Aggregates. 4 Credits.

Major focus is on primary and tertiary prevention within a social systems framework. Creative application of nursing process to families and groups utilizing family systems theory and group dynamics. Prerequisites: NU-310.

NU-350. Trends and Issues in Nursing. 2 Credits.

Current status of professional nursing. Political, economic and social trends affecting nursing and the health care system are analyzed. Issues in professional practice and education are explored. Prerequisites: NU-302.

NU-360. Computer Applications in Nursing and Health Care. 2 Credits.

The application of computer technology to patient care, nursing practice, research, education and management is explored. Health care information management systems are introduced. Prerequisites: NU-390.

NU-390. Introduction to Nursing Research. 3 Credits.

Understanding of the research process and critique of research studies. The relevance of nursing research findings for the provision of patient care is discussed. Students develop a research paper through an interactive process with faculty and peers. Prerequisites: # NU-330(9711) # PS-200 OR SO-448.

NU-399. Undergraduate Nursing Tutorial. 2 Credits.

NU-404. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. 5 Credits.

This course focuses on the use of the nursing process to provide care for individuals, families and aggregates with alterations in mental health. Pluralistic factors as well as medication therapy are integrated. Strategies to promote mental-health are discussed. Nursing care of clients with acute and chronic alterations in psychological functioning are stressed. Clinical experiences are provided in psychiatric-mental health agencies in selected health care and community settings. Prerequisites: 3 COURSES PS-235, SO-121, NU-315.

NU-414. Nursing Care for Children and Adolescents. 5 Credits.

The nursing process is used as a framework to provide care for children and adolescents with physical and psychological alterations in health. Pluralistic factors including nutrition and medication therapy are integrated. Strategies to promote health as well as developmental needs and problems are discussed. Normal family functioning and the impact of illness on the family are explored. College laboratory and clinical experiences in selected health care settings. Prerequisites: 3 COURSES FROM PS-235, NU-308, NU-325.

NU-416. Social Justice Ethics and Health Care. 3 Credits.

Political, economic and social justice issues affecting patient care and the health care system are examined. Accessibility and affordability of health care services including the needs of vulnerable populations are explored. Strategies to promote social justice and ethical behavior within the health care system are stressed. Values course.

NU-420. Community Health Nursing. 4 Credits.

Community health nursing emphasizes community as client. The nursing process is applied in dealing with groups, aggregates and community. Nursing care of individuals in community settings is also examined. Prerequisites: NU-430 OR NU-440.

NU-430. Nursing Care for Adults and Aging III. 4 Credits.

Culmination of the courses Adults and Aging I and II, this course builds and expands the knowledge and skill base related to caring for adults and older clients with complex acute and chronic conditions and rehabilitative health care needs. High risk populations such as those with multiple illnesses will be address. Pathologic conditions associated with aging are discussed. Pluralistic factors, including nutrition and medication therapy are integrated. An opportunity for students to function with increased independence as well as to organize, delegate, supervise and evaluate care. Clinical experiences in selected health care settings. Prerequisites: NU-315.

NU-440. Leadership and Management in Nursing. 4 Credits.

The major focus is on leadership and change in nursing practice within the health care delivery system, utilizing the nursing process as a framework. Prerequisites: NU-420.

NU-445. Leadership and Trends in Nursing. 3 Credits.

The major focus in this course is on leadership and change in nursing practice within the health care system. Utilization of the nursing process as a framework for action is stressed. Selected concepts related to management including, types of power, delegation, motivation are discussed. Trends and issues affecting nursing and the health care system are also explored.

NU-450. Nurse/Client Educator. 2 Credits.

A multifaceted approach to client/peer education. Emphasis on teaching/ learning concepts. The role of education as a strategy in health promotion. Prerequisites: NU-302.

NU-452. Women's Health Issues. 3 Credits.

Exploration of health issues affecting women from historical, political and pluralistic perspectives. The students' role as health care advocate is stressed. Prerequisites: NU-302.

NU-470. Dimensions of Professionl Nursing. 4 Credits.

The emphasis of this course is on the professional role of nursing with a focus on leadership and community health practice. The concepts of professionalism, nursing process and pluralism are explained. Leadership theory and the health care system are analyzed. Community health nursing is examined and the principles of health promotion and client education are integrated into the conduction of a community project. Pre-Req: Admission to RN-MSN Program.

NU-495. Special Projects in Nursing RN-BSN. 1 Credit.

This is a one credit elective in which students may choose a topic of interest and complete a scholarly paper guided by the faculty. Students may choose to expand upon a topic they have already been exposed to or develop a new topic of interest. The student will document progress on the project through weekly submissions corresponding to specific content required for the summative learning outcome of the course, the final scholarly paper.

PC Courses

PC-110. Science Goes to the Movies. 3 Credits.

This course considers the evolution of the science behind the movies - the technical advances that have made modern movie making possible and how the treatment of science, scientific discovery and inventions have evolved particular movie genres. Lectures and movie clips will be used to illustrate the above.

PC-130. Technology in the 21st Century. 3 Credits.

This course will discuss the history, development and scientific breakthroughs that have led to the amazing devices and technologies available to humans today. Particular attention to the people, time and places involved in the development of inventions like TV, radio, computers, phones, transmission of electric power, movies, and some of the many advances in genetics and medicine.

PC-140. How Stuff Works. 3 Credits.

This course will illustrate how the many devices we use in everyday life were invented and how they work. Devices like the radio, TV, microwave, smart phones, computers, etc. will be used as examples.

PC-185. General Physics I. 3 Credits.

Classical mechanics. Prerequisites: MA-124 MA-144 OR MA-133.

PC-186. General Physics II. 3 Credits.

Electromagnetism. Optics. Atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: PC-185 MA-124 MA-144 OR MA-133.

PC-187. General Physics Laboratory I. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course to accompany Pc185.

PC-188. General Physics Laboratory II. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course to accompany Pc186.

PC-190. Applied Electronics. 3 Credits.

DC and AC circuits, semiconductor devices, operational amplifiers, digital logic, and digital computer fundamentals. Prerequisites: PC-191.

PC-191. Applied Electronics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course to accompany PC190. Prerequisites: PC-190.

PC-210. LabVIEW Measurement and Automation. 3 Credits.

Introduction to National Instruments LabVIEW program and its interaction with various instruments, measurements and automation.

PC-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

Co-operative work experience.

PC-300. Math Methods in Physics. 3 Credits.

This one semester course offers a comprehensive introduction to a variety of mathematical subjects used in the areas of physics with application to specific problems. Topics covered include: Vector and Tensor Analysis, Functions of a complex Variable and Calculus of Residues, Strum-Liouville Theory, Introduction to Special Functions and Fourier Series. Prerequisites: PC-186 MA-144.

PC-331. Electronics. 4 Credits.

Circuit principles, diodes and rectifiers, filters transistors as amplifiers and switches, operational amplifiers with applications, oscillators. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: PC-185 PC-186 PC-187 PC-188.

PC-336. Physical Electronics. 3 Credits.

Semiconductor theory and the physics of diodes, of bipolar transistors, and of field- effect transistors. Prerequisites: PC-186.

PC-337. Modern Physics. 4 Credits.

The special theory of relativity, quantum phenomena, atomic and nuclear structure, molecular spectra, radio activity, fission and fusion, elementary particles. Lecture and Laboratory.

PC-344. Optics. 4 Credits.

Geometrical optics, wave nature of light, interference, diffraction, polarization, selected topics in quantum optics. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: PC-185 PC-186 OR PC-190.

PC-350. Photonics. 3 Credits.

Wave-particle duality of light, fiber optics, interferometers, imaging systems, optical spectroscopy, polarization devices, LEDs and Lasers, optical detectors. Prerequisites: PC-185 PC-188.

PC-355. Thermodynamics and Stat Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Heat and heat transfer, thermal behavior of gases, the laws of thermodynamics, entropy and enthalpy, partition functions, and engineering applications. Prerequisites: PC-185 PC-186.

PC-370. Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Theory of small vibrations. Gravitation, moving frames of reference. Relativistic dynamics. Prerequisites: MA-247 PC-185 PC-186.

PC-374. Electricity and Magnetism I. 3 Credits.

Electrostatics in free space and in the presence of dielectrics and conductors. Magnetostatics. Electromagnetic induction. The Maxwell equations. Prerequisites: PC-186.

PC-380. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Mathematical foundation of quantum mechanics. Schroedinger's equation with applications. The one-electron atom. Selected topics in atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: PC-186.

PC-390. Independent Study in Physics. 1 Credit.

This course provides the opportunity for individual work on an assigned research problem. Prerequisites: PC-185 PC-186 MA-274.

PE Courses

PE-103. Principles and Foundations of Physical Education. 3 Credits.

An examination of the historical and philosophical development of physical education from ancient times to the present. To acquaint the student with physical education as a profession.

PE-150. Physiology of Exercise and Healthy Aging. 3 Credits.

The investigation of the physiological age-related changes that occur in the later stages of life with a special emphasis on the necessary adaptations to exercise and nutrition.

PE-201. Adapted Physical Education for Special Needs Students. 3 Credits.

This course will provide an overview of adaptive physical education including an expanded definition, historical background, classifications and IEP development, assessment practices and teaching and instructional strategies for the special needs students. Prerequisites: PE-100.

PE-202. Fundamentals of Coaching. 3 Credits.

An overview of current coaching theory and practice with a special emphasis on the scientific literature depicting best practices and professionalism. In addition, course content will include pedagogy, ethics, the physiological and psychological aspects of athlete development and approaches to teaching technical and tactical skills. This course includes field experience and active learning modules. Prerequisites: PE-103.

PE-240. Teaching of Skills Activities I. 3 Credits.

A study of the basic principles, content, organization and curriculum for individual, dual and team activities for elementary school students. Includes methods and teaching strategies, program evaluation and peer teaching. Variable sport activities.

PE-241. Teaching of Skills Activities II. 3 Credits.

A study of basic principles, content, organization & curriculum for individual, dual & team activities for middle school and high school students. Includes methods and teaching strategies, program evaluation and peer teaching. Variable sports activities.

PE-255. Fitness and Wellness. 3 Credits.

This course helps students adopt and maintain behavior associated with an active and healthy lifestyle. Through lecture and exercise, students will learn behavioral patterns consistent with current knowledge in fitness and wellness.

PE-295. Co-Operative Education. 3 Credits.

Co-operative education experience.

PE-301. Technology in Health and Fitness. 3 Credits.

This class is a comprehensive introduction to technology in the physical education classroom, and health and fitness and sport-oriented facilities. It explores developmentally appropriate usage of educational technology in the home, school, and workplace as it relates to the development and maintenance of optimal health and fitness. Emphasis is on computer and Internet technologies. The course includes hands-on computer techniques, critical analysis of National Technology Standards, practical experience with curriculum design, and technology-driven exercise prescription. Prerequisites: PE-103.

PE-310. Kinesiology. 3 Credits.

Application of facts and principles of anatomy and mechanics to the study of human motion, including the systematic approach to the analysis of motor skill activities.

PE-311. Biomechanics. 3 Credits.

The study of the laws of mechanics as they relate to physical movement, skill development, and athletic performance. Special attention is paid to the muscular, joint, and skeletal actions of the body and how they may impact performance.

PE-350. Sport Facility Operation and Event Management. 3 Credits.

Planning, Organization and Operation of Sport Facilities and management of events. Prerequisites: SM-228.

PE-352. Exercise Physiology I. 3 Credits.

A study of the physiological effects of movement on the human body and the relationship existing among muscular, respiratory, circulatory and nervous systems.

PE-353. Exercise Physiology II. 3 Credits.

The continued study of the physiological effects of movement on the human body and the relationships existing among muscular, respiratory, circulatory and nervous systems. Prerequisites: PE-352.

PE-360. Sports Medicine. 3 Credits.

To teach students the basis of being a certified athletic trainer and includes injury recognition, prevention, evaluation, treatment, rehabilitation and administration of athletic injuries.

PE-410. Legal and Ethical Issues in Sports. 3 Credits.

A hybrid values course that includes topics in policy development, labor movement in sports, collective bargaining in sports organizations, ethical dilemmas and implications. Prerequisites: SM-228 AND TH-120 OR PL-101.

PE-498. Internship in Health and Physical Education. 3 Credits.

Field Work experience in the areas of health and physical education.

PE-499. Internship. 3 Credits.

Field work experience in the areas of Sports Management and/or Health & Physical Education.

PL Courses

PL-100. Introduction to Philosophy I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to Philosophy and its history, with special emphasis on the classical philosophies of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.

PL-101. Introduction to Philosophy II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the history of modern philosophy, with a special emphasis on the philosophy of Rene Descartes, and the debate between Rationalism and Empiricisn. Prerequisite: PL-100 Prerequisites: PL-100.

PL-130. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to philosophy. The course will cover major areas of philosophical concern, including an analytical and historical introduction to logic, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophical anthropology, and philosophy of God. Many of the perennial problems of philosophy such as the nature of knowledge and reality, the mind-body problem, free will vs determinism, reason vs faith, as well as an introduction to major philosophers in the tradition, including, but not limited to, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, and Hume, will be covered.

PL-140. Introduction to Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to moral philosophy, including Natural Law ethics, Kantian deontology, Utilitarian consequentialism, virtue-based ethics, and modern rights theory. These normative theories will be applied to select moral issues, which may include sexual morality, abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, discrimination, just war theories, and/or animal rights.

PL-151. Contemporary Ethical Issues. 3 Credits.

A philosophical examination of contemporary moral issues, which may include sexual morality, abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, economic justice, discrimination, just war theories, and/or animal rights. Values course. Prerequisites: PL-100, PL-101.

PL-153. Logic. 3 Credits.

An examination of the basic principles of human reasoning, with emphasis on traditional logic and critical thinking. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

PL-200. Rhetoric, Speech and Argument. 3 Credits.

This course studies and practices the art and process of persuasion. Students will learn to develop good arguments, identify fallacies, present a position in a convincing manner, and develop ethos or ethical appeal. Prerequisites: PL-100.

PL-230. Critical Moral Thinking. 3 Credits.

PL-100 PL-101;.

PL-232. Philosophy of Human Nature. 3 Credits.

A course in philosophical anthropology. This course will investigate some ancient and modern theories that offer explanations for the nature, meaning, and purpose of human beings. Values course. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

PL-240. General Ethics. 3 Credits.

A study of the various approaches to ethical theory, including Natural Law theory, Kantian deontology, Utilitarian consequentialism, virtue-based ethics, and modern rights theory. These general normative theories will then be applied to select moral issues. Values course. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

PL-248. Political Philosophy. 3 Credits.

A philosophical investigation of the person's relationship to the state and civil society. An analysis of the concepts of law, rights, justice, political obligation and authority, civil disobedience, anarchism and revolution. Values course. Prerequisites: PL-100 OR PL-101.

PL-253. Business Ethics. 3 Credits.

An examination of contemporary moral issues in business, including the nature of economic justice, the rights and duties of economic agents, and the nature of a just society. Prerequisites: PL-100, PL-101.

PL-254. Contemporary Issues Bioethics. 3 Credits.

An examination of contemporary issues in biomedical ethics, including abortion, euthanasia, the doctor-patient relationship, confidentiality, truth-telling, genetics, cloning, reproductive technologies, the just allocation of scarce medical resources. Values course. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

PL-259. Technology Society and Values. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of ethical considerations related to technology and its impact on society. Prerequisites: PL-100, PL-101.

PL-311. Philosophy and Bob Dylan. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the philosophical, ethical and cultural themes in Bob Dylan's lyrics. Philosophical ideas such as appearance versus reality, truth and knowledge, and good and evil will be explored through a comprehensive study of Dylan's music. Prerequisites: PL-101 OR TH-120.

PL-316. The Philosophy of Immanuel Kant. 3 Credits.

Immanuel Kant is arguably the most important philosopher of modernity. This course explores many key themes and elements of Kant's critical philosophy, including not only his epistemology, but also his great impact on ethical theory and social and political philosophy. Prerequisites: PL-100, PL-101.

PL-320. Asian Philosophy. 3 Credits.

An examination of the philosophies of India and China, including a text-based study of the Upanishads, the philosophy of Yoga, Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

PL-340. Feminist Philosophy. 3 Credits.

An study of feminist philosophical theory. Topics for discussion include feminist epistemology, feminist social and political philosophy, gender and reproduction, feminist ethics, and patriarchy. Values course. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

PL-353. Philosophy of Mind. 3 Credits.

A philosophical examination of the nature of consciousness, including such topics as the relationship between mind and body, human freedom, the soul and it's possible immortality. Values course. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

PL-380. Ethics and Leadership. 3 Credits.

An examination of the moral foundations and ethical consideration of what makes an ethical leader. Key questions include: What is leadership? What is ethical leadership? What types of costs result from poor leadership? How can one become an ethical leader? Prerequisites: PL-100 AND PL-151 OR PL-230 OR PL-240.

PL-390. Special Projects Philosophy. 3 Credits.

Able students and willing teachers may design special courses or other projects for credit in philosophy. Proposals are to be submitted, for review, through the chairperson of the Philosophy Department. Credit is also available to students who wish to enroll in the Cooperative Education Program. Prerequisites: PL-100 OR PL-101.

PL-399. Tutorial. 3 Credits.

PL-425. Symbolic and Mathematical Logic. 3 Credits.

A systematic investigation of mathematical and logical structures. The primary areas of study are the logic of connectives, the logic of quantifiers, and key issues in metalogic. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

PL-448. Plato's Dialogues. 3 Credits.

Through close study of selected longer dialogues, students will examine Plato's philosophical world-view, including the theory of value and meaning he conveys in his writings as a way of further exploring moral theory. Values course. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

PL-450. Plato's Republic. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of Plato's "Republic", focusing on the nature of the human soul, the good life for us, the education that best promotes the good life. The role of virtues, and the metaphysics & epistemology that underlies those answers. Prerequisites: PL-100, PL-101.

PO Courses

PO-100. Perspectives on Politics. 3 Credits.

An introductory study of the political values, concepts and institutions that define and span the field political science in the areas of American politics, international affairs, comparative politics, and political theory.

PO-130. Introduction to Nonviolence. 3 Credits.

A study of violence and human nature, the theory and practice of nonviolence, how conflicts - local and global - can be solved nonviolently, and the lives of past and current peacemakers, including Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day and many others.

PO-155. Introduction to Environmental Politics. 3 Credits.

This course will explore how environmental issues - such as climate change, resource extraction and energy use - are shaped by politics and political systems at the international, domestic and local levels. We will also examine the ways in which environmental issues have shaped politics - with concepts such as sustainable development and environmental justice - since the emergence of the environmental movement.

PO-200. Research Methods in Political Science. 3 Credits.

An introduction to political science research methodologies, including quantitative and qualitative techniques, research ethics and culminating in a student research project and term paper. Prerequisites: PO-100.

PO-201. American Government. 3 Credits.

An introductory study of the principles, institutions and power relationships of the American governmental system. Topics include the politics of the American Founding, the federal arrangement between the national and state governments, the operations of the Congress, the president, and the courts, and the roles of elections, political parties and interest groups.

PO-202. Global Citizenship I: Issues, Policy and Decision Making. 3 Credits.

An examination and discussion of what it means to be a "global citizen" in the 21st century. Through the framework of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, students will analyze their role as global citizens. Students may attend colloquia at the United Nations, as well as lectures at Saint Peter's, given by accomplished professionals in various fields. They will then analyze the information they hear and perform their own research into current issues - in class, in writing, and online - in order to learn about the world in which we live and become effective decision makers.

PO-207. The Mass Media and American Politics. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the interactions between the American mass media and the U.S. political system, and how these two centers of power influence each other. Topics include media organization and ownership, the legal and political contours of press freedom, the norms and processes of news reporting, the relationships between the media and conduct of the U.S. elections, and the relationships between the media and the operations of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of the government.

PO-215. United States Foreign Policy. 3 Credits.

An examination of the principal historical influences and major institutions involved in the formulation and execution of foreign policy.

PO-250. Introduction to Social Justice. 3 Credits.

An examination of how racism, classism and sexism create barriers to the realization of a more equal and just society, with a particular focus on pressing current social justice issues - such as affordable housing, health care, immigration, the prison system, war and the environment - and the people that are working to build a better world.

PO-275. Introduction to International Relations. 3 Credits.

Examination of the system of nation states, blocs, and rivalries in the world order. Approaches to the explanation of power and security, the use of force and war and international social, economic, and environmental problems.

PO-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

PO-301. Ancient and Medieval Political Theory. 3 Credits.

A survey of the classic works of political theory from its inception through the Middle Ages: Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas.

PO-303. Early American Political Theory. 3 Credits.

An examination of the formation of the American political consciousness from its beginnings until the end of the Civil War.

PO-304. Recent American Political Theory. 3 Credits.

A survey of the evolution of the American public argument from the reconstruction until the present, with emphasis on today's debate on current issues such as climate change, the uneasy relationship between capitalism and democracy, the privileging of privatization, etc.

PO-310. Feminist Political Theory. 3 Credits.

Historical overview of feminist political activity in the United States and an analysis of feminist theory: liberal feminism, Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and post-modern feminism.

PO-311. Peace and Justice Issues Within Political Theory. 3 Credits.

Historical overview of the peace movement in America and an analysis of contemporary concerns such as war and peace, wealth and poverty, racism and sexism.

PO-312. The American Congress. 3 Credits.

An in-depth examination of the organization and decision-making processes of the U.S. Congress, and the political considerations and forces that influence the work of members of Congress in both the Senate and House of Representatives. Topics include the legislative intentions and designs of the Founders, the representational and lawmaking functions of Congress, the norms, organization and processes of each chamber, the parameters of congressional elections, the roles of political parties and interest groups, and the relationships between Congress and the other two branches of government.

PO-313. The American Presidency. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the evolution of the presidency, and its modern functions, decision-making processes, and political influence over American governance. Topics include the contrasting and changing visions of the presidency, the presidential election process, the connections between the president and the public, the institutional organization and operations of the presidency, the relationships between the president and the other two branches of government, and the presidential role in national security and foreign affairs.

PO-314. The American Judicial Process. 3 Credits.

An in-depth examination of the roles, decision-making processes and organization of the state and federal courts, and the impact of the judiciary on American politics. Topics include the function of law, the roles of lawyers and judges, the formal and informal structures and operations of courts, and the elements, procedures and purposes of trials and appeals and of criminal and civil proceedings.

PO-315. American Campaigns and Elections. 3 Credits.

An in-depth exploration of the dynamics, challenges and political parameters of American elections. Topics include the evolving roles of political parties, consultants, interest groups and candidates, the structures and complexities of the primary and general election processes, the resources, organization and strategies of political campaigns, and the behavior of American voters.

PO-327. Environmental Politics and Policies. 3 Credits.

This course explores the shifting political forces that determine environmental policies. Included is an examination of pressures, interest groups, and the media. Prerequisites: EV-100.

PO-365. Introduction to Security Studies. 3 Credits.

An introductory course in the field of security studies that will survey major IR theories and different definitions of conflict, security, stability, peace, war and their significance in both historical and contemporary perspectives. It will explore the causes of mass violence (war) and interstate peace and their gradations in the international state system. The course will also review the basic literature of military strategy and its relation to the onset and evolution of international crises, war, and peace. It will discuss major philosophical works on the notions of conflict, security, violence, war, and peace among state actors.

PO-378. Global Inequality. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the patterns of economic and political inequality that exist between countries and within countries in the contemporary international system.

PO-409. Constitutional Law and Governmental Powers. 3 Credits.

An advanced and case law-focused seminar on the allocation of governmental powers under the U.S. Constitution. Topics are explored through the study of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and include an examination of the separate powers of the national legislative, executive and judicial branches, the checks and balances that channel their operations, the relationship between the national and state governments, and the extensive reach of the national Commerce Clause and Spending Clause powers.

PO-411. Nationalism and Revolution. 3 Credits.

A comparative and analytical study of nationalism and revolutionary movements. Nation-building in contemporary underdeveloped countries.

PO-414. Understanding Global Terrorism. 3 Credits.

This course, drawing on comparative global and historical experiences, exposes the student to the various regional expressions of terrorism (Asia, Latin America, N. America, Europe). Political, economic, nationalist and religious forms of terrorism receive considerable scholarly attention in this course.

PO-417. Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties. 3 Credits.

An advanced and case law-focused seminar on human rights and civil liberties under the U.S. Constitution. Topics are explored through the study of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and include an examination of religious liberty, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, the right to privacy, and the rights of equality and freedom from discrimination.

PO-422. Comparative Politics: Middle East and North Africa. 3 Credits.

Regional and international dimensions of politics in the area. The formation of nation- states nationalism, superpower rivalries, the Arab-Israel conflict and the Palestinian question, the politics of oil, energy, and development, Islamic revival and prospects for stability, change and democracy.

PO-424. Comparative Democratization. 3 Credits.

This course reviews the vast literature concerned with the transition from authoritarianism to democracy in various parts of the world. The concepts of democracy and authoritarianism are thoroughly explored, followed with a comparative review of actual cases of democratic and authoritarian rule that include problems facing newly established democracies. Along with the historical development of democracy and its "requisites," the course then focuses on the "third wave" of democratization, with attention to cases in Southern Europe, South America, East and Central Europe, with secondary review of other cases in Asia or Africa.

PO-477. International Law. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the principles and norms of international law and how they regulate political and economic interactions at the global level. A case oriented emphasis on treaties, the law of war, and dispute settlement. Prerequisites: PO-100.

PO-479. International Political Economy. 3 Credits.

An examination of the dynamics of wealth and power in the global system. Emphasis given to issues of trade, monetary relations and economic interdependence. Regulatory efforts at the national, regional and international levels are analyzed. Prerequisites: PO-100.

PO-480. Development and Disaster Risk Reduction. 3 Credits.

This course investigates the relationship between global development strategies and disaster risk, resiliency and preparedness in international and local perspective. Prerequisites: PO-100.

PO-486. Seminar: Genocide. 3 Credits.

After a thorough conceptualization of genocide, the course will examine case studies of modern genocide, ranging from the 20th and 21st centuries.

PO-492. Seminar in Comparative Politics. 3 Credits.

Examination and discussion of selected issues in comparative politics. Students will have the opportunity to explore a specific issue through faculty-guided research projects. Restricted to juniors and seniors with departmental approval. Prerequisites: PO-100.

PO-498. Seminar: Political Poetry and Music. 3 Credits.

This course considers the relationship between aesthetics and political philosophy. Political themes flowing through poetry and music, analyzed both in terms of their message and medium, use in political activism, etc.

PO-499. Political Science Capstone. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive oral exam of each sub-discipline in political science and general political science knowledge. Prerequisites: PO-100.

PS Courses

PS-140. Psychology of Success. 3 Credits.

Psychology of Success is a course based upon a self-oriented exploration of basic psychological concepts, principles, theories, and the fundamental habits of research. It is designed to expose students to psychology as a discipline through an emphasis on constructs related to habits related to personal success. This course does not count for Psychology majors.

PS-151. Introduction to Psychology. 3 Credits.

Exploration of the methods and applications of psychology; introduction to research techniques, concepts, theories, and findings about normal and abnormal behavior.

PS-170. Marriage and Family. 3 Credits.

Examination of the dynamics and functioning of family systems (forming relationships, communication, marriages, sexuality, childraising, cross generational interactions, possible estrangements, the influences of gender and culture, and family therapy) through lecture, discussion, and class participation. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-200. Statistics and Research Methods. 3 Credits.

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on research methodology and applications in psychology. Prerequisites: MINIMUM GRADE OF C IN PS-151.

PS-205. Experimental Psychology. 3 Credits.

Examination and training in experimental methodology with a focus on the scientific method and empiricism. Topics include the philosophy of science, statistics, developing and testing hypotheses, control techniques, designs, and ethics. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-210. Advanced Statistics and Computer Applications. 3 Credits.

An overview of the ways in which computers are used in psychology. Topics include experimental data analysis using statistical packages such as SPSS, library research using PsycLIT, creating resumes, APA style, and PowerPoint presentations for conferences. Prerequisites: PS-200 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-220. Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Study of the individual in the social environment examination of such topics as attitude formation and change, social influence, leadership and community, intergroup relations, aggression, and altruism. Prerequisites: EARN C OR BETTER IN PS-151.

PS-230. Childhood and Adolescence. 3 Credits.

A survey of the physical, intellectual, social, and personality development that occurs during infancy, toddlerhood, childhood, and adolescence. Prerequisites: EARN C OR BETTER IN PS-151.

PS-235. Life Span Development. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive examination of the basic principles, stages and aspects of human growth and development from birth to senescence. May replace PS230 as a required course, but cannot take both PS230 and PS235. Prerequisites: EARN C OR BETTER IN PS-151.

PS-240. Adulthood and Aging. 3 Credits.

Examination of the developmental changes in the human life cycle from young adulthood through maturity. Focuses on patterns of change and growth during adulthood, social attitudes, and gerontological psychology. Prerequisites: EARN C OR BETTER IN PS-151.

PS-250. Personality. 3 Credits.

Exploration of personality theories including psychoanalysis, cognitive, behavioral and humanist approaches as they describe the development, functioning, and organization of the individual. Examination of the personal and clinical relevance of the theories. Prerequisites: EARN C OR BETTER IN PS-151.

PS-260. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Credits.

Description of normal and abnormal personality with emphasis on etiology, manifestations, dynamics, treatment, and prevention of social/psychological dysfunctions. Prerequisites: EARN C OR BETTER IN PS-151.

PS-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

PS-305. Tests and Measurements. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the theory and methods of assessing intelligence, attitudes, human abilities, and personality. Supervised experience with tests. Prerequisites: EARN C OR BETTER IN PS-151.

PS-310. Social Experimental Psychology. 3 Credits.

The study of individual behavior in the social environment with an emphasis on quantitative experimental techniques used to examine theories and models. Techniques include observational research, ethics in human research, questionnaire research, formal experiments, naturally occurring studies, archival studies and non-interventional field research. Topics include attitude formation, social influence, leadership, intergroup relations, aggression and altruism. Prerequisites: EARN C OR BETTER IN PS-151.

PS-311. Capstone: Seminar Lab Social Experiment. 3 Credits.

PS-320. Learning. 3 Credits.

An examination of the major historical and contemporary theories of learning. Discussions will focus mainly on the critical analysis of experiments conducted on both animals and humans. Lectures will be supplemented with classroom demonstrations and exercises. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-321. Capstone: Seminar and Lab in Learning. 3 Credits.

PS-340. Physiological Psychology. 3 Credits.

Relationships between physiological processes and behavior with emphasis on the role of the central nervous system in human behavior. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-350. Cognitive Processes. 3 Credits.

Examination of the issues, theories, and applications of memory, attention, pattern recognition, organization of knowledge, language, reasoning, and problem solving. In studying these topics, we will use the information processing and connectionist approaches. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-351. Capstone: Seminar and Lab in Cognitive Process. 3 Credits.

PS-398. Undergrad Psychology Research. 3 Credits.

Readings, reports and conferences aimed at preparing the student for independent research under supervision of a staff member. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-400. Moral Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course provides a broad introduction to the field of moral psychology with an emphasis on recent developments in the field. Topics include how people make moral judgements, how people define the moral domain, the relationship between emotional morality, and how morality affects behavior. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-401. Capstone: Seminar and Lab in Moral Psychology. 3 Credits.

Capstone laboratory and seminar in Moral Psychology.

PS-406. Political Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of political psychology. Topics will include such things as psychology political ideology, political decision making and intergroup conflict. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-407. Capstone: Seminar and Lab in Political Psychology. 3 Credits.

Capstone laboratory and seminar in Political Psychology.

PS-420. History of Psychology. 3 Credits.

Survey of the origins and historical development of psychology leading to an analysis of main theories and systems. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-430. Industrial-Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

Study of behavior in organizational and business-related settings. Examination of such topics as employee motivation and satisfaction, communication patterns, effective leadership strategies, and organization development. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-431. Capstone: Seminar and Lab in Industrial-Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

PS-435. Forensic Psychology. 3 Credits.

The application of psychology to the legal and criminal justice systems including psychology and the law, incarceration of the mentally ill, the psychology of policing, competency to stand trial, risk assessment, psychometric testing, evaluation of witness and expert testimony. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-445. Sport Psychology. 3 Credits.

The study of behavior in sport and exercise with a focus on how psychological factors affect physical performance and how sport and exercise affect psychological development, health, and well-being. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-450. Cross-Cultural Psychology. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the study of human behavior as a result of living in a given culture. Topics include bilingualism, comparison of personality, perceptual, and cognitive development in different societies, gender roles, and special issues in cross-cultural research. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-455. Biological Foundations: Human Sexuality. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the biological foundations of human sexuality. Topics include sexual anatomy and physiology, human reproduction, development, dysfunctions, therapy, and health. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-463. Psychopathology and Film. 3 Credits.

An advanced course in the clinical areas of diagnosis and treatment of mental illness applying the diagnostic and statistical manual (DSM) guidelines to selected films. Prerequisites: PS-151, PS-250 OR PS-260 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-480. Special Topics in Psychology. 3 Credits.

An advanced exploration of a selected topic in contemporary psychology. Prerequisites: PS-151 MINIMUM GRADE C.

PS-481. Capstone: Seminar and Lab in Special Topics in Psychology. 3 Credits.

PS-499. Capstone: Seminar and Lab in General Psychology. 3 Credits.

Capstone seminar and lab in general Psychology. Prerequisites: EARN C OR BETTER IN PS-210 AND PS-205.

RD Courses

RD-010. Dynamics of College Reading. 3 Credits.

A program of selected readings, vocabulary enrichment, and guided study which enables students to develop an effective approach to study by introducing them to selected reading in diverse fields, including their major.

SE Courses

SE-370. Improvement of Reading in the The Secondary Schools Using Technology. 3 Credits.

The concepts and principles associated with the teaching of reading, the diagnosis of disabilities. Methods and materials employed in the improvement of reading, remedial classes and individual case studies.

SE-400. Principles and Techniques of Instruction in the Middle and Secondary School. 3 Credits.

Through this course, students develop the ability to teach in middle and secondary schools by applying the principles and techniques of effective instruction. The course introduces the required standards in all disciplines and requires students to create original units of instruction, which include appropriate assessment tools. Students will design and implement lesson plans using various teaching styles and methodologies. Finally, students will assess their teaching ability and will plan their continued professional development.

SE-408. Principles of High School Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Historical, legal, and community factors influencing the secondary school curriculum and general curriculum orientation. Departmental responsibilities in the area of curriculum. Innovative curriculum projects, programs for gifted and talented, special education, and bilingual students.

SE-495. Student Teaching: Secondary. 8 Credits.

A supervised classroom teaching experience on the secondary level (7-12), including seminar meetings and conferences scheduled prior to and during the student-teaching term. Prerequisites: ED-490 ED-491.

SE-499. Student Teaching: Secondary. 6 Credits.

A supervised classroom teaching experience on the secondary level (7-12), including seminar meetings and conferences scheduled prior to and during the student-teaching term. Prerequisites: ED-490 ED-491.

SJ Courses

SJ-130. Introduction to Nonviolence. 3 Credits.

A study of violence and human nature the theory and practice of nonviolence, how conflicts - local and global - can be solved nonviolently and the lives of past and current peacemakers, including Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day and many others.

SJ-136. Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will offer students an introduction to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered studies. Along with a focus on the history of this topic as a social movement, the course examines the topic from community, social justice and lifestyle perspectives.

SJ-140. Introduction to Women's Studies. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to women's studies, including its roots in the feminist and civil rights movements and the construction of gender in culture and society, giving specific attention to forms of gender inequality in the family, workplace, religion, healthcare, and relationships.

SJ-155. Introduction to Environmental Politics. 3 Credits.

This course will explore how environmental issues - such as climate change, resource extraction and energy use - are shaped by politics and political systems at the international, domestic and local levels. We will also examine the ways in which environmental issues have shaped politics - with concepts such as sustainable development and environmental justice - since the emergence of the environmental movement.

SJ-203. Global Citizenship II: U. N. Earth Chart. 3 Credits.

As in "Global Citizenship I: Issues, Policy and Decision Making" (PO-202), here students will examine what it means to be a "global citizen" in the 21st century--in this case through the framework of the United Nations Earth Charter. PO-202 is not a prerequisite. Prerequisites: PO-100.

SJ-216. Gender, Sexuality and Religion. 3 Credits.

Religion is known to have devoted considerable energy to regulate sexual norms and gender roles. This course seeks to help students to understand the social construction of religion, gender and sexuality. It will analyze and examine how different religions view gender and sexuality and how religion construct, reconstruct, and deconstruct gendernorms and sexuality. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SJ-223. Latin America Today: People, Culture and Issues. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the diverse societies of Latin America from a social science perspective. We will explore everyday life and experiences as they relate to culture and diversity, race, ethnicity and gender, politics and the economy, migration and urbanization, social justice and pop culture.

SJ-235. Harlem Renaissance. 3 Credits.

This course examines the period beginning in the 1920's known as the Harlem Renaissance. It was a time when black and white Americans alike discovered the vibrancy and uniqueness of black art, music, and literature. The class will also examine the importance of external forces, both positive and negative. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

SJ-245. Haitians in America. 3 Credits.

Examines the history and experiences in America, paying special attention to how and why Haitians come to the U.S. It also explores patterns of settlement and mobility as well as interaction with other groups. Prerequisites: AS-175, AS-177 OR SO-121.

SJ-250. Introduction to Social Justice. 3 Credits.

An examination of how racism, classism and sexism create barriers to the realization of a more equal and just society, with a particular focus on pressing current social justice issues - such as affordable housing, health care, immigration, the prison system, war and the environment - and the people that are working to build a better world.

SJ-310. Feminist Political Theory. 3 Credits.

Historical overview of feminist political activity in the United States and an analysis of feminist theory: liberal feminism, Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and post-modern feminism.

SJ-311. Philosophy and Bob Dylan. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the philosophical, ethical and cultural themes in Bob Dylan's lyrics. Philosophical ideas such as appearance versus reality, truth and knowledge, and good and evil will be explored through a comprehensive study of Dylan's music. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101 OR TH-110 TH-120.

SJ-328. Social Work in Urban Systems. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the major social welfare systems in America and the field of social work as the profession charged with implementing social welfare today. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SJ-333. Black Community and the Law. 3 Credits.

An examination of the role of the American legal process in African American history from 1619 to the present, with concentration on laws and their application during the slavery and post-slavery era, the early and mid 1900's, and in modern rural and urban life. Topics include civil rights, constitutional, property, and criminal law.

SJ-370. Urban Anthropology. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the emergence of urban culture in its present form from its neolithic roots. Emphasis on urban life in the New Jersey area, with reference to the peoples and cultures in urban environments world-wide. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SJ-378. Global Inequality. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the patterns of economic and political inequality that exist between countries and within countries in the contemporary international system.

SJ-401. World Literature. 3 Credits.

Selected readings of important works from around the world (read in translation), principally from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisites: EL-123, EL-134.

SJ-412. Ethnicity and Race in Urban History. 3 Credits.

Includes the African and European immigrant experiences in America, the effects of slavery and urbanization, and the formation of class consciousness. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151 OR PO-100, AND SO-280 AND SO-384.

SJ-443. Black Theology. 3 Credits.

The study of the origins and influence of the major religious traditions found in the American black community. May be used as a substitute for Th120. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

SJ-454. Black Films. 3 Credits.

A survey of 20th century film making by and about African-Americans. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-116 CM-117 CM-119 CM-120 OR HP-122.

SJ-460. U.S. Civil Rights Movement. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the origins, processes, and outcomes of the twentieth century black American Civil Rights struggle.

SJ-465. Vietnam and the U.S.. 3 Credits.

A multidimensional view of the Vietnam era. U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia as a backdrop for an examination of changes in America from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s. Impact of Vietnam on civil rights, youth culture, the women's movement. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SJ-486. Seminar: Genocide. 3 Credits.

After a through conceptualization of genocide, the course will examine case studies of modern genocide, ranging from the 20th and 21st centuries. Prerequisites: SO-121, UR-151 OR PO-100.

SM Courses

SM-228. Introduction to Sports Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to help participants gain an indepth understanding of the fundamental principles and key skills associated with sports administration and management.

SM-250. Sports Communication. 3 Credits.

Media and public relations strategies in the sports industry are reviewed. Exposure to the use of web publications/multimedia and development. Prerequisites: SM-228.

SM-251. Finance in the Sports Industry. 3 Credits.

Managerial control in sports organizations is studied. Prerequisites: SM-228 AC-151 EC-101.

SM-295. Co-Op. 3 Credits.

SM-310. Sports Law. 3 Credits.

Sports law covers the legal issues at work in the world of both amateur and professional sports. Topics include labor issues, antitrust, tort Law and the business and academic aspects of sports law. Prerequisites: BA-228.

SM-350. Sport Facility Operation and Event Management. 3 Credits.

Planning, Organization and Operation of Sport Facilities and management of events. Prerequisites: SM-228.

SM-410. Legal and Ethical Issues in Sports. 3 Credits.

A hybrid values course that includes topics in policy development, labor movement in sports, collective bargaining in sports organizations, ethical dilemmas and implications. Prerequisites: SM-228.

SM-450. The Global Sports Industry. 3 Credits.

The history and issues in sports from a global perspective. A pluralistic lens is used to explore the relationship of gender, culture, and social institutions on sports. Prerequisites: SM-228.

SM-499. Internship. 3 Credits.

Field work experience in the areas of Sports Management and/or Health & Physical Education.

SO Courses

SO-121. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits.

An examination of Sociology both as a practicing profession and scientific discipline, with an introduction to research methods, concepts, theories, and findings about the social world. Comparisons are made between Sociology and the other. An exploration of the potential relevance of Sociology to the job market is a part of this course.

SO-130. Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the study of Latin American and Latino communities in the United States. Course topics will include, but are not limited to Lain American history, U.S.-Latin American relations, migration, colonization, historical, and contemporary issues.

SO-136. Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will offer students an introduction to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered studies. Along with a focus on the history of this topic as a social movement, the course examines the topic from community, social justice and lifestyle perspectives.

SO-137. Introduction to Nonviolence. 3 Credits.

A study of violence and human nature the theory and practice of nonviolence, how conflicts - local and global - can be solved nonviolently and the lives of past and current peacemakers, including Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day and many others.

SO-140. Introduction to Women's Studies. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to women's studies, including its roots in the feminist and civil rights movements and the construction of gender in culture and society, giving specific attention to forms of gender inequality in the family, workplace, religion, healthcare, and relationships.

SO-200. Ethnic and Racial Relations. 3 Credits.

The study of interethnic and interracial relations. American and international experiences of immigrant groups, majorities, minorities, dominant cultures, and subcultures. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

SO-208. Sociology of Film. 3 Credits.

The impact of films on Society from a Sociological perspective and an analysis of Social structure and Social institutions (economy, race, culture, gender, etc.) through masterpieces of cinema. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-210. TV and Society. 3 Credits.

This course examines how the medial shapes society and in-turn how society shapes the media. While initially focusing on television, the class now looks at more recent forms of the communication. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-216. Gender, Sexuality and Religion. 3 Credits.

Religion is known to have devoted considerable energy to regulate sexual norms and gender roles. This course seeks to help students to understand the social construction of religion, gender and sexuality. It will analyze and examine how different religions view gender and sexuality and how religion construct, reconstruct, and deconstruct gendernorms and sexuality. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-221. Surveillance in the Cybercity. 3 Credits.

Smartphones, debit cards, social networking sites, transportation systems, and public spaces increasingly produce troves of data about everyday life. This data is used by governments, corporations, educational institutions, activist organizations, and everyday people. This course critically analyzes forms of urban surveillance so as to reconsider personal and collective rights to privacy, property, and security within the contemporary cybercity. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-224. Black Hair and Identity in America. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the social, cultural and political significance of black hair in America. It will explore hair's profound impact on identity. Black hair is embedded in notions of race, ethnicity, gender and class. Prerequisites: AS-177 SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-225. Sociology of Consumer Culture. 3 Credits.

This course explores the dynamics of the market economy. What and why do people consume? What are the forces behind this? Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-227. Sociology of Salsa. 3 Credits.

This course combines dance lessons with a sociological exploration of New York/New Jersey's salsa scene. Students will learn the fundamentals of salsa music and dance, with a focus on rhythm, timing, musicality and basic steps. Lessons are complemented by discussions and origins of the music a it relates to Latin American and Caribbean history and migration to the northeast. Finally, students will investigate the culture of socials, which are dance parties dedicated to learning and practicing the dance. Class meets two hours per week for lessons and requires a minimum of two additional hours per week of fieldwork TBA. Dance shoes or dance sneakers required. Prerequisites: SO-121 UR-151 OR LS-101.

SO-232. China: Environmental Change and Possibilities. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the social, political, economic and cultural variable that impact the Chinese environmental deterioration and these consequences for the world at large. Alternative models of environmental conservation are included. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-233. Visual Sociology. 3 Credits.

Visual sociology is the study of visual images and their role and influence in society. It includes such media as: art, photographs, film, video, newspapers, magazines, advertisements, graphic novels along with many other forms of visual communication. This area of sociology examines the experience of living in an intensely visual world and how it may enhance as well as constrain our lives. It also explores how to use photography, film, video and other media as research tools in studying social issues and communicating findings with the public to bring about social change. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-234. Sociology of Ethnic Cuisine. 3 Credits.

Understanding society and ethnic diversity through an in-depth study of cuisine, focusing on the traditions, rituals, symbolism and meaning of food materials, food preparation and consumption. The course examines the role of food in defining ethnic identity and in deciphering the interaction between tradition and modernity Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-245. Haitians in America. 3 Credits.

Examines the history and experiences in America, paying special attention to how and why Haitians come to the U.S. It also explores patterns of settlement and mobility as well as interaction with other groups. Prerequisites: AS-175 OR AS-177 OR SO-121.

SO-251. Current Social Problems. 3 Credits.

Examination of controversial public issues using sociological theory and research as the resources change and conflicts in values as the source of new problems. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-253. Social Deviance. 3 Credits.

Explores the concepts of social norms, egocentricity, and ethnocentricity. Examines the relativity of deviance including criminal behavior, human sexuality, drug use, suicide, and other alternative forms of behavior.

SO-254. Sociology of Migration and Immigration. 3 Credits.

Immigration in history patterns of movement immigration and refugees adjustment and resettlement immigration law. The needs of immigratants housing, employment education, medical care. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-256. Sociology of Sports. 3 Credits.

This course uses both readings and films to explore the impact of economic and political forces and changing constructions of gender and social values on organized athletics at the professional and amateur levels. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-273. Global Feminisms. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course explores global issues and debates regarding significant issues affecting women's lives and opportunities for equality.

SO-275. Pre-Columbian Civilizations. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the cultures, including their rises and falls, of a number of pre-Columbian cultures from archeological and cultural anthropological perspectives. Inca, Myan, Aztec, and Others. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR LS-101.

SO-280. Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

Classical themes of Sociology and major theoretical achievements from 1815 to the present. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-283. The Conspiracy Theory Film. 3 Credits.

The course looks at the themes of conspiracies and paranoia in film and popular culture. Students examine how social and political conflicts through the decades have created fears of large-scale corruption in organizations of power and how these fears were translated to the movie screen. Prerequisites: CM-106 CM-117 CM-120.

SO-288. The Role of Religion in Social Protest. 3 Credits.

This course examines various formal and informal roles of religions in social protest from the New York City uprisings through Black Lives Matter and beyond. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151 OR AS-177.

SO-295. Cooperative Education. 3 Credits.

SO-300. Wealth, Power and Prestige: Social Stratification. 3 Credits.

Classic Theories and recent research on social inequality and mobility. The linkage of class and behavior education in behavior in education, religion and politics is an essential part of the course. This course utilizes a variety of sociological concepts to examine work as a social institution. In addition to the formal analysis offered, participants in the course will have the opportunity to examine their own role in the world of work. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-313. Human Evolution, Ecology and Adaptation. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course focuses on evolutionary adaptations of the human species to nature and ways it has adapted nature to serve its needs. These adaptations and their consequences for changes in human ways of life are central to this course. Prerequisites: BI-184 OR SO-121.

SO-324. Sociology of Work. 3 Credits.

This course utilizes a variety of sociological concepts to examine work as a social institution. In addition to the formal analysis offered, participants in the course will have the opportunity to examine their own role in the world of work. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-326. The Anthropology of Gender. 3 Credits.

Course is a cross cultural, comparative and historical examination of the different constructions of gender (masculinity and feminism). Includes symbolic meanings of sexual differences and how these meanings influence life cycle ritual, etc... Prerequisites: SO-121 OR SO-384.

SO-333. Black Community and the Law. 3 Credits.

An examination of the role of the American legal process in African American history from 1619 to the present, with concentration on laws and their application during the slavery and post-slavery era, the early and mid 1900's, and in modern rural and urban life. Topics include civil rights, constitutional, property, and criminal law.

SO-345. Sociology of Intimacy. 3 Credits.

This course will explore sexual scripts the social control of marrying negotiating and bargaining marriage roles the dynamics of family interaction conflict and divorce. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-351. Issues in the Latino Community. 3 Credits.

The socio-economic and political origins of the various Hispanic peoples, with analysis of social issues arising from Hispanic involvement in American societal substitutions, i.e. education, politics, family, etc. Prerequisites: SO-121 UR-151 OR LS-101.

SO-360. Intercultural Relations. 3 Credits.

An examination of the influence of cultural factors on human thought, emotion and action. Theoretical and methodological issues in intercultural relations are reviewed and observational studies conducted. Prerequisites: SO-121 SO-384.

SO-368. Health and Inequalities: Race, Class and Gender. 3 Credits.

This course critically examines the relationship between health status and social inequalities along the lines of race and ethnicity, social class and gender. We begin with an overview of epidemiology and the idea of studying health from a sociological perspective. We then consider the complex relationship between socio-economic status (class) and health statuses, followed by an examination of specific health issues for major racial/ethnic minorities and gender groups. We will try to understand how low socioeconomic status leads to poor health, how conscious, unconscious, and institutionalized racial/gender bias affects medical care and health outcomes, and address ideas for reducing health disparities among all groups. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-370. Urban Anthropology. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the emergence of urban culture in its present form from its neolithic roots. Emphasis on urban life in the New Jersey area, with reference to the peoples and cultures in urban environments world-wide. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-384. Cultural Anthropology. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the development of anthropology as an offshoot from Sociology an examination of the differences in the methodology of anthropology and Sociology in the study of a variety of cultures. Prerequisites: SO-121 PL-100 OR PL-101 OR TH-110 OR TH-120.

SO-389. Latina Research in Action. 3 Credits.

Students will learn about the theoretical underpinnings of participatory action research and will engage in existing or new participatory projects in education with Latina communities.

SO-399. Tutorial. 1 Credit.

SO-412. Ethnicity and Race in Urban History. 3 Credits.

Includes the African and European immigrant experiences in America, the effects of slavery and urbanization, and the formation of class consciousness. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151, AND SO-280 AND SO-384.

SO-448. Statistics in the Social Sciences. 3 Credits.

Descriptive and inferential statistics including measures of central tendency and variability, linear correlation, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: SO-121 SO-380.

SO-450. Research Techniques: Social Sciences. 3 Credits.

Paradigms, theory and research the nature of causation research design conceptualization and measurement operationalization indexes, scales and typologies sampling types of Social research: experiments, surveys, field research, unobtrusive research, and evaluation research. Emphasis on active learning through exercises, report writing and student projects. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151 SO-280.

SO-451. Sociology Issues: Public Policy. 3 Credits.

SO-454. Black Films. 3 Credits.

A survey of 20th century film making by and about African-Americans. Prerequisites: CM-115 CM-116 CM-117 CM-119 CM-120 OR HP-122.

SO-465. Vietnam and the U.S.. 3 Credits.

A multidimensional view of the Vietnam era. U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia as a backdrop for an examination of changes in America from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s. Impact of Vietnam on civil rights, youth culture, the women's movement. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-472. Sociology of the Professions. 3 Credits.

History of the professions: the medieval guilds the nineteenth century and the development of applied science. Professions as communities peer evaluation and professional ethics. Prerequisites: SO-121.

SO-479. Science, Technology and Society. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary values course that examines from the perspectives of natural science, philosophy and political science, how technology evolves in society, the impact of technology on our lives, and the critical decisions that technology requires.

SO-489. Globalization and Fieldwork Seminar. 3 Credits.

Short term study/travel course in which students conduct first hand investigations on the effects of globalization in relevant settings. Specific area and topics determined at the beginning of the Academic Year. Locations change every term. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151 OR PO-100.

SO-492. Urban Internship. 3 Credits.

Advanced levels of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-493. Advanced Urban Internship. 3 Credits.

Advanced levels of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-495. Internship in International Settings. 3 Credits.

Planned and supervised off-campus working experiences overseas or with international organizations integrated with independent academic study under the tutelage of the Director of International and intercultural Studies. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

SO-496. Senior Seminar in Sociology. 3 Credits.

This capstone course ties together the various components in the Sociology Major as well as prepares graduates for the next level. Students will develop a synthesis production. Should be taken last term senior year. Prerequisites: SO-121 SO-280 SO-345 SO-384.

SO-498. Special Projects in Sociology I. 3 Credits.

Tutorial courses and reading courses in special areas of sociology. May be taken for one or two terms.

SP Courses

SP-113. Elementary Spanish I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basic grammar and vocabulary of spoken and written Spanish.

SP-114. Elementary Spanish II. 3 Credits.

Continued practice in the grammar and vocabulary of spoken and written Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-113.

SP-117. Spanish for Health Care Professions I. 3 Credits.

Grammar and vocabulary taught through dialogues and situations related to the healthcare professions.

SP-118. Spanish for Health Care Professions II. 3 Credits.

Further practice in grammar and vocabulary related to the healthcare professions. Prerequisites: SP-117.

SP-119. Spanish for Business and Finance I. 3 Credits.

Study of Spanish grammar, pronunciaton, writing, and vocabulary with an emphasis on business and financial usage. Prerequisites: SP-114 OR 1-2 YEARS HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-120. Spanish for Business and Finance II. 3 Credits.

Further study of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, writing, and vocabulary with an emphasis on business and financial usage. Prerequisites: SP-119.

SP-133. Intermediate Spanish I. 3 Credits.

Presentation of advanced grammar and vocabulary for improved listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing. Practical use of Spanish through dictation, oral and written exercises, sight-reading, and guided conversation. Prerequisites: SP-114 OR 1-2 YEARS HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH.

SP-134. Intermediate Spanish II. 3 Credits.

Presentation of advanced grammar and vocabulary for improved listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing. Practical use of Spanish through dictation, oral and written exercises, sight-reading, and guided conversation. Prerequisites: 1-2 years of high school Spanish, Sp114, or Sp196. Prerequisites: SP-133.

SP-135. Intermediate Spanish for Native Speakers I. 3 Credits.

Provides instruction and practice in the elements of grammar, syntax, spelling, and formal knowledge and use of the language.

SP-136. Intermediate Spanish for Native Speakers II. 3 Credits.

Provides instruction and practice in the elements of grammar, syntax, spelling, and formal knowledge and use of the language. Prerequisites: SP-135 OR LS-135.

SP-180. Hispanic New York: Language and Culture. 3 Credits.

Study of Hispanic language and culture through New York Metropolitan venues taught in conjuction with AR-180. Prerequisites: AR-180.

SP-195. Spanish: Social Services I. 3 Credits.

Serves social workers, police officers, medical professionals, and those in related fields. Basic grammar structures and specialized vocabulary writing exercises, conversation, and role play. Fulfills core language requirement. Prerequisites: SP-114 OR 1-2 YEARS HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH.

SP-196. Spanish: Social Services II. 3 Credits.

Serves social workers, police officers, medical professionals, and those in related fields. Basic grammar structures and specialized vocabulary writing exercises, conversation, and role play. Fulfills core language requirement. Prerequisites: SP-195.

SP-198. Introduction to Hispanic Literature I. 3 Credits.

A basic introduction to the principal literary genres through readings in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-114 OR 3-4 YEARS HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-199. Introduction to Hispanic Literature II. 3 Credits.

A continued introduction to the principal literary genres through readings in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-198.

SP-243. Survey: Literature of Spain I. 3 Credits.

Origins and evolution of literature from xarcbas to contemporary works. Required for Spanish majors and minors. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 SP-136 SP-199 OR 3-4 YEARS H.S. SPANISH.

SP-244. Survey: Literature of Spain II. 3 Credits.

Origins and evolution of literature from xarcbas to contemporary works. Required for Spanish majors and minors. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-243 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-245. Hispanic American Literature I. 3 Credits.

Development of Hispanic-American literature from its origins through the 18th century. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-246. Hispanic American Literature II. 3 Credits.

Development of Hispanic-American literature from the 19th century to the present. Prerequisites: SP-245 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-248. Spanish Cultural History in Film. 3 Credits.

Examination of the rich cultural history of Spain as it has been presented through film. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-249. Cultural Geography of Hispanic America. 3 Credits.

A study, through readings and video, of the history, culture, and societal aspects of the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-250. Spanish Conversation I. 3 Credits.

Intensive practice in Spanish conversation through discussion of interesting topics, as well as review of critical grammatical structures and vocabulary to facilitate effective expression. Prerequisites: SP-114 SP134 OR 1-2 YEARS H. S. SPANISHL.

SP-251. Spanish Conversation II. 3 Credits.

Intensive practice in Spanish conversation through discussion of interesting topics, as well as review of critical grammatical structures and vocabulary to facilitate effective expression. Prerequisites: SP-250 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-265. Social Justice in Latin American Film. 3 Credits.

Analysis of film, viewed politically and socially, as a mediator of the dynamics of tradition and change in Latin America. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-290. Advanced Grammar and Composition. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the finer points of Spanish grammar and their application in stylistics. Prerequisites: SP-134 SP-136 SP-199 OR 3-4 YEARS H.S. SPANISH.

SP-292. Translation. 3 Credits.

Practice in technical, commercial, scientific translation, legal documents and business correspondence, Spanish English, English- Spanish. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR SP-199.

SP-293. Business Spanish. 3 Credits.

SP-294. Business Writing in Spanish. 3 Credits.

Review of Spanish grammar and syntax through the study of various forms of business writing, including letters, memos, bills, order forms, receipts, resumes, and other forms of correspondence. Prerequisites: SP-114 OR 1-2 YEARS HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH.

SP-300. Medieval Literature in Spain. 3 Credits.

Development of Medieval Spanish literature from the jarchas to La Celestina. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-310. Spanish Novel of the 19th Century. 3 Credits.

Study of the major novelists of 19th-century Spain, including Pardo Bazan, Blasco Ibanez, and Galdos. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-312. The Generation of 1898. 3 Credits.

Ganivet, Unamuno and other writers of the Generation of 1898. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-320. Marco Polo and the Silk Road. 3 Credits.

Exploration, through literature, art, film, and music, of Marco Polo's adventures along the Silk Road as he winds his way through Asia.

SP-355. Seminar: Literature of the Boom. 3 Credits.

Analysis of several of the representative texts of the explosion of Hispanic-American literary production onto the world market, in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-357. Literature and Politics : Hispanic-America. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the expression of political ideologies in Hispanic America in and through literature of various genres, Nation-building and statecraft. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-359. Seminar: Literature of the Boom II. 3 Credits.

Continued analysis of the representative texts of the explosion of Hispanic-American literary production onto the world market, in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-361. History and Culture of the Philippines. 3 Credits.

A survey of Filipino history from its origins to the present and examination of its culture, as expressed through its customs, art, music, film, and food.

SP-362. History and Culture of Cuba. 3 Credits.

Study of the language, traditions, history, and culture of Cuba from its origins to the present.

SP-370. Picaresque Literature. 3 Credits.

Study of the Picaresque genre through the analysis of representative works such as Lazarillo De Tormes, Guzman De Alfarache, and La Vida Del Buscon. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR SP-199 OR 3-4 YEARS HS SPANISH.

SP-378. Spanish Drama. 3 Credits.

SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL;.

SP-388. Spanish Civil War in Literature and Film. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the people, places, and events that shaped the Spanish civil war as they are presented in literature and film.

SP-390. Spanish for Business. 3 Credits.

Specialized and technical vocabulary and situations relating to the Hispanic commercial world. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-391. Spanish Translation. 3 Credits.

Study of theories of translation and extensive practice in translation from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-392. Caribbean Literature. 3 Credits.

This course will explore aspects of Caribbean literature in Spanish from Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic. Readings will include essays, short stories, poems, and novels from the Encounter to the present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-399. Tutorial. 3 Credits.

Topics: To Be Determined by Chairperson and Instructor.

SP-490. Seminar: Don Quijote. 3 Credits.

Readings, research, and analysis of Cervantes' novel in its socio-cultural, political, and aesthetic contexts. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

SP-496. Survey of U. S. Latino Literature I. 3 Credits.

Study of the major authors and works of U.S. Latino literature from its origins through the mid-twentieth century. Prerequisites: SP-134 OR SP-136 OR INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL.

TH Courses

TH-110. Religious Faith in the Modern World. 3 Credits.

A critical inquiry into the possibility, the meaning, and the vale value of religious faith in the context of modern knowledge and experience. It is conducted from a Judeo-Christian perspective, but in dialogue with the other religious traditions of the world.

TH-120. Introduction to the Study of Christianity. 3 Credits.

A critical reflection on the meaning of the Christian faith as it is set forth in the New Testament, as it is found in the living tradition of the Church, as it is reflected on by modern thinkers, and as it bears on the issues of our time. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121.

TH-121. Space, Place and the City (Metropolitan Seminar). 3 Credits.

Field trips to various sites of devotion and worship in metropolitan New York, supplemented by readings and discussion, will address issues of holiness and how a community's sacred space relates to its sense of holiness. Our analysis will result in a substantial term project and synthetic discussion about the impact of religious space/place on political, intercultural, and inter-religious relations. *Honors Students only.

TH-122. Pilgrimage in the City. 3 Credits.

New York City and metropolitan area are examined in light of places related to pilgrimage, as a source of insight into the religious dynamics of the drive to make pilgrimages, particularly in Christianity. *Honors students only. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121.

TH-300. Methods and Sources of Theology. 3 Credits.

An inquiry into the relationship between faith and reason, modern methods of analyzing and interpreting Scripture, and the role of experience, tradition, the Magisterium, and the human sciences in Theology. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-301. Modern Christian Community: The Church. 3 Credits.

A study of the origin, importance, significance, and activities of the Body of Christ for the disciples of Jesus in his time and our own. Special attention given to different images and structures of the Church and contemporary ecclesial issues. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-305. The Orthodox Church. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of the Eastern Orthodox Church, with special attention devoted to teachings and traditions that are unique to Orthodox Christianity in its historical and doctrinal developments, anthropological theology, Trinitarian theology, worship, sacraments, mystical tradition, moral teachings, and veneration of icons. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-320. Survey of the Old Testament. 3 Credits.

A survey of the Old Testament literature with attention to its literary forms, its history, and its religious message. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-330. Survey of the New Testament. 3 Credits.

Reading of the New Testament literature with attention to histo-critical methods of scriptural interpretation, literary forms, historical development, and theological content. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-331. The Other Gospels. 3 Credits.

A study of the ancient gospels that were not included in the New Testament, using theological comparisons, analysis of their literary genres and social contexts to discover who valued them, who did not, and why.

TH-335. Veils to Vestments: Women's Leadership in Ancient Religion. 3 Credits.

This course explores the religious roles and offices taken by women in antiquity using evidence from the Bible and Greco-Roman world. Methodologies for uncovering this evidence and reconstructing women's history will be evaluated. We also consider its implications and applications for the twenty-first century. Prerequisites: TH-110 TH-120 OR EQUIVALENT.

TH-350. Who Is Jesus Christ?. 3 Credits.

A study of the person and significance of Jesus Christ for contemporary Christians in light of Scripture, Catholic Tradition, the Magisterium, and contemporary theologians. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-405. Theology and Classic American Films. 3 Credits.

This course analyzes classic American films for their religious themes, values, and symbolism. Study of film's capacity to depict universal truths of human experience and how they relate to spirituality, morality, and to explicitly Judeo-Christian themes such as guilt, evil, redemption, liberation, meaningful suffering, self-sacrifice, virtue and vice, and transforming love. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-421. Prophets and Their Interpretation. 3 Credits.

Prophecy and the prophetic traditions of the Old Testament are traced from their origins through their later use in Jewish and Christian writings. Selected texts focus on the religious experience of various prophets and their vision for justice, compassion and hope. Prerequisites: TH-110 TH-120 OR EQUIVALENT. TH-320 RECOMMENDED.

TH-430. Jerusalem: King David to Caliph 'Umar. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the significance of Jerusalem for Jews and Christians from the time of King David c. 1000 B.C.E. to its takeover by the Muslims under Caliph 'Umar in 638 C.E. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-431. Medieval Jerusalem: Muslims, Christians and Jews. 3 Credits.

An examination of Jerusalem from the beginning of its Muslim period to the Ottomans, and the interactions of the three religions competing for it as their holy city. Archaeological, literary and scriptural evidence receive particular attention. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-443. Black Theology. 3 Credits.

The study of the origins and influence of the major religious traditions found in the American black community. May be used as a substitute for TH120. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-453. The Zen Spirit. 3 Credits.

Chinese and Japanese Buddhist Scriptures. Application of Zen to modern American life. Integration of Zen and Christianity. The practice of zazen. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-470. Towards a Christian Theology of Personalism. 3 Credits.

A history and analysis of the development of the concept of person and Christian Personalism as seen in Revelation, classical and modern theologians, and the encounter of Theology with Philosophy. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-481. A Theology of Human Sexuality. 3 Credits.

Human sexuality as seen in the light of Biblical teaching a historical survey of sexual attitudes, documents of contemporary faith communities, contributions of the behavioral sciences and recent theological reflection, including a case-study approach to moral dilemmas. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-484. Christian Medical Ethics. 3 Credits.

Contemporary questions such as abortion, sterilization, technological reproduction, human experimentation, care of the dying, and genetic engineering, studied in the light of the Judaeo-Christian moral tradition. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-486. Morality in the Marketplace. 3 Credits.

An attempt to apply Judaeo-Christian principles to the decision-making process in business, given the economic realities of the market place. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-489. International Travel Course. 3 Credits.

TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122;.

TH-495. Theology Capstone. 3 Credits.

This course is a guided research paper on a topic of the student's choice which fulfills the Capstone Course/Project requirement for a major in Theology. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122 AND TH-350.

TH-496. Theology and Urban Problems. 3 Credits.

A theological view of the Christian tradition on various contemporary urban problems such as poverty, injustice, racism, sexism, housing, unemployment. A study of some actual and possible responses to these problems. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-497. St. Augustine and The Confessions. 3 Credits.

Background, sources, reading and interpretation of this classic work in the context of Augustine's culture and theology. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-498. Seminar on Death and Dying. 3 Credits.

A multi-disciplinary study of the experience of dying as shaped by contemporary attitudes. Theological reflection on the perennial mystery of death, and ethical issues surrounding death and dying. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

TH-499. Theology and Contemporary Public Issues. 3 Credits.

Deals with the theological implications of various contemporary environmental and ecological issues: nuclear energy, pollution, nutrition, world hunger, genetics. Prerequisites: TH-110 OR TH-121 AND TH-120 OR TH-122.

UR Courses

UR-126. Introduction to Public Policy and Social Action. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the public policy and will answer the following questions: What is public poicy? Who makes public policy? What impact does public policy have on our lives? The course examines the relationship between public policy and social action.

UR-137. Introduction to Nonviolence. 3 Credits.

A study of violence and human nature the theory and practice of nonviolence, how conflicts - local and global - can be solved nonviolently and the lives of past and current peacemakers, including Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day and many others.

UR-151. The Contemporary City. 3 Credits.

Basic Urban Studies Course. Historical development of urbanization and industrialization in America. Problems of urban development, including housing, environment, crime, race, ethnicity, and class.

UR-202. Urban Music: Jazz to Hip-Hop. 3 Credits.

This course studies the history of urban music from jazz to rock and roll up to today's urban sounds. The course will concentrate both on the music and its socioeconomic impact on the urban landscape. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-219. Exploring Urban Experience Through Film. 3 Credits.

This course uses masterpieces of cinema to explore the city and urban culture. Topics will include the economy, race, culture, gender, immigration, gentrification and crime. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-220. Urban Architecture and Design. 3 Credits.

Using the city as a labaratory, the class will investigate the various shapes that form, and have formed, the urban environment. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-224. Black Hair and Identity in America. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the social, cultural and political significance of black hair in America. It will explore hair's profound impact on identity. Black hair is embedded in notions of race, ethnicity, gender and class. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-235. Harlem Renaissance. 3 Credits.

This course examines the period beginning in the 1920's known as the Harlem Renaissance. It was a time when black and white Americans alike discovered the vibrancy and uniqueness of black art, music, and literature. The class will also examine the importance of external forces, both positive and negative. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

UR-237. Urban Economic Problems. 3 Credits.

UR-251. The American City Through the Wire. 3 Credits.

Very few television shows have captured the realities of the American city and the imaginations of the American public more than the Wire. More than a crime drama, the Wire reminds the viewer that all the pieces matter, as each of the five seasons focuses on a particular facet of the city: the illicit drug trade, working class employment, municipal government and bureaucracy, children and the education system, and the print news media. Using the Wire as the primary text, this course will look at the history of American cities, paying close attention to each season's theme.

UR-273. Global Feminisms. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course explores global issues and debates regarding significant issues affecting women's lives and opportunities for equality. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-288. The Role of Religion in Social Protest. 3 Credits.

This course examines various formal and informal roles of religions in social protest from the New York City uprisings through Black Lives Matter and beyond. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151 OR AS-177.

UR-300. Wealth, Power and Prestige: Social Stratification. 3 Credits.

Classic Theories and recent research on social inequality and mobility. The linkage of class and behavior education in behavior in education, religion and politics is an essential part of the course. This course utilizes a variety of sociological concepts to examine work as a social institution. In addition to the formal analysis offered, participants in the course will have the opportunity to examine their own role in the world of work. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-308. Analysis of Urban Social Class. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the processes leading to formation of socio-economic classes in the urban context, including the role of income, wealth, occupation, education, ethnicity, and race. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

UR-309. Women in Changing Urban World. 3 Credits.

Historical and contemporary examination of urban revolution as social basis for changing roles of women. Generation of conflicts and possibilities. Implications for society. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

UR-310. American Utopias. 3 Credits.

The Utopian ideal from ancient times to the present, emphasizing the urban strand study of urban communities, past and present, workplace ownership, land trusts, co-ops, and garden cities. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

UR-311. Strategies for Urban Change. 3 Credits.

Focuses on two levels of strategies directed at social and economic change in American cities: government strategies and strategies employed by urban groups seeking change. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-315. Computers for Public Policy. 3 Credits.

Course designed to give public sector workers computer literacy with special emphasis on word processing, spreadsheet analysis, computer graphics, etc. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-324. Poverty and Inequality. 3 Credits.

Description and anaylsis of the causes, characteristics and consequences of poverty. Links between poverty and inequality. Measurement of the different dimensions of poverty and inequality. Comparative analysis of poverty and inequality across countries. Poverty reduction policies and strategies. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-326. Community Organization. 3 Credits.

This course examines community organizing in terms of what it is, its impact and the obstacles to change. The course focused on how to bring groups together for collective change. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

UR-327. Environmental Politics and Policies. 3 Credits.

This course explores the shifting political forces that determine environmental policies. Included is an examination of pressures, interest groups, and the media. Prerequisites: EV-100.

UR-328. Social Work in Urban Systems. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the major social welfare systems in America and the field of social work as the profession charged with implementing social welfare today. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-333. Black Community and the Law. 3 Credits.

An examination of the role of the American legal process in African American history from 1619 to the present, with concentration on laws and their application during the slavery and post-slavery era, the early and mid 1900's, and in modern rural and urban life. Topics include civil rights, constitutional, property, and criminal law. Prerequisites: SO-121, AS-177 OR UR-151.

UR-334. Foodscapes: Urban Encounters. 3 Credits.

This course seeks to question the ?ordinary? places of food in urban environments and global society. How we mark the spaces of food production, consumption, gastronomy, and disposal in urban settings are the control questions of the class. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-353. Black Family. 3 Credits.

A look at the historical, political, social, and economic forces that shape the contemporary Black family. Prerequisites: AS-177 OR UR-151.

UR-370. Urban Anthropology. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the emergence of urban culture in its present form from its neolithic roots. Emphasis on urban life in the New Jersey area, with reference to the peoples and cultures in urban environments world-wide. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-410. Managing Cross-Cultural Training Skills. 3 Credits.

Analysis of cross-cultural training techniques developed to improve relations between people of different cultures. Resources employed are actual techniques currently used by the U.S. State Department, international corporations and international educational organizations. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-412. Ethnicity and Race in Urban History. 3 Credits.

Includes the African and European immigrant experiences in America, the effects of slavery and urbanization, and the formation of class consciousness. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151, AND SO-280 AND SO-384.

UR-451. Social Issues in Public Policy I. 3 Credits.

An historical examination of social forces and responses, particularly at the grassroots level, which have contributed to our present institutional arrangements. Particular emphasis is given to the effect of social forces on public policy. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-452. Social Issues in Public Policy II. 3 Credits.

An investigation of public policy issues affecting constituencies in need of social services, such as older citizens, the homeless and those inadequately housed, and those in need of medical care. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-460. The U.S. Civil Rights Movement. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the origins, processes, and outcomes of the twentieth century black American Civil Rights struggle. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-465. Vietnam and the U.S.. 3 Credits.

A multidimensional view of the Vietnam era. U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia as a backdrop for an examination of changes in America from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s. Impact of Vietnam on civil rights, youth culture, the women's movement. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-489. Globalization and Fieldwork Seminar. 3 Credits.

Short term study/travel course in which students conduct first hand investigations on the effects of globalization in relevant settings. Specific area and topics determined at the beginning of the Academic Year. Locations change every term.

UR-490. Urban Field Work. 3 Credits.

Introductory level of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

UR-491. Advanced Urban Field Work. 3 Credits.

Advanced level of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

UR-492. Urban Internship. 3 Credits.

Advanced levels of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

UR-493. Advanced Urban Internship. 3 Credits.

Advanced levels of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required. Prerequisites: UR-151 OR SO-121.

UR-494. Senior Seminar in Sociology/Urban Studies. 3 Credits.

This capstone course ties together the various components in the Sociology/Urban Studies major as well as prepares graduates for the next level. Restricted to Juniors and Seniors in the Public Policy Program. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

UR-496. Theology and Urban Problems. 3 Credits.

A theological view of the Christian tradition on various contemporary urban problems such as poverty, injustice, racism, sexism, housing, unemployment; a study of some actual and possible responses to these problems.

UR-498. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

UR-499. Theological and Contemporary Public Issues. 3 Credits.

Deals with the theological implications of various contemporary environmental and ecological issues: nuclear energy, pollution, nutrition, world hunger, genetics.

WS Courses

WS-136. Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will offer students an introduction to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered studies. Along with a focus on the history of this topic as a social movement, the course examines the topic from community, social justice and lifestyle perspectives.

WS-140. Introduction to Women's Studies. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to women's studies, including its roots in the feminist and civil rights movements and the construction of gender in culture and society, giving specific attention to forms of gender inequality in the family, workplace, religion, healthcare, and relationships.

WS-216. Gender, Sexuality and Religion. 3 Credits.

Religion is known to have devoted considerable energy to regulate sexual norms and gender roles. This course seeks to help students to understand the social construction of religion, gender and sexuality. It will analyze and examine how different religions view gender and sexuality and how religion construct, reconstruct, and deconstruct gendernorms and sexuality. Prerequisites: SO-121.

WS-223. Latin America Today: People, Culture and Issues. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of the diverse societies of Latin America from a social science perspective. We will explore everyday life and experiences as they relate to culture and diversity, race, ethnicity and gender, politics and the economy, migration and urbanization, social justice and pop culture.

WS-253. Sociology of Salsa. 3 Credits.

Explores the concepts of social norms, egocentricity, and ethnocentricity. Examines the relativity of deviance including criminal behavior, human sexuality, drug use, suicide, and other alternative forms of behavior.

WS-256. Sociology of Sports. 3 Credits.

This course uses both readings and films to explore the impact of economic and political forces and changing constructions of gender and social values on organized athletics at the professional and amateur levels. Prerequisites: SO-121.

WS-273. Global Feminisms. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course explores global issues and debates regarding significant issues affecting women's lives and opportunities for equality. Prerequisites: WS-140.

WS-285. Gender and Communication. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the field of study of communications and gender. The objective is the explanation, observation, discussion and understanding of gender and how it affects communication at the personal, group, organization and societal levels and how gender is portrayed in our culture through digital technology and the mass media.

WS-307. Women in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the roles of women in pre- modern times, discussing the theological and social attitudes that often hindered their advancement and the accomplishments they achieved nevertheless in politics, society, and culture. Prerequisites: HS-121 HS-122.

WS-310. Feminist Political Theory. 3 Credits.

Historical overview of feminist political activity in the United States and an analysis of feminist theory: liberal feminism, Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and post-modern feminism.

WS-311. Philosophy and Bob Dylan. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the philosophical, ethical and cultural themes in Bob Dylan's lyrics. Philosophical ideas such as appearance versus reality, truth and knowledge, and good and evil will be explored through a comprehensive study of Dylan's music. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101 OR TH-110 TH-120.

WS-326. The Anthropology of Gender. 3 Credits.

This course is a cross cultural, comparative and historical examination of the different constructions of gender (masculinity and feminism) and how gender has shaped the perspectives, methods and subject matter of anthropology's four fields. Prerequisites: SO-140 OR WS-140.

WS-333. Gender Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

An in-depth survey of changing social values about gender, changing criminal codes about sex crimes, changing law enforcement policies and procedures in prosecuting sex offenders, and emerging legal doctrines about privacy and sexual rights. Prerequisites: CJ-170 OR CJ-390 OR SO-121 OR WS-140.

WS-335. Veils to Vestments: Women's Leadership in Ancient Religion. 3 Credits.

This course explores the religious roles and offices taken by women in antiquity using evidence from the Bible and Greco-Roman world. Methodologies for uncovering this evidence and reconstructing women's history will be evaluated. We also consider its implications and applications for the twenty-first century. Prerequisites: TH-110 TH-120 OR EQUIVALENT.

WS-340. Feminist Philosophy. 3 Credits.

This class will investigate trends in feminist philosophy, with close attention given to the influence of gender considerations on philosophical theory. Topics for discussion include feminist epistemology and political theory, and patriarchy. This class is a Values course. Prerequisites: PL-100 PL-101.

WS-345. Sociology of Intimacy. 3 Credits.

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of intimate social relations: sexual, familal and friendship. It explores the role played by intimate relationships in the development of human societies, the cultural construction of sexual scripts, coupling and marriage practices and kinship systems. Prerequisites: SO-121 OR UR-151.

WS-350. Human Sexuality in Health Education. 3 Credits.

An overview of human sexuality and behavior with special emphasis on health education.

WS-366. Mapping Asian and Latino Bodies. 3 Credits.

Creating "maps" of Asian and Latino Bodies in the cultural spaces of film, art, literature, and photography.

WS-368. Health and Inequalities: Race, Class and Gender. 3 Credits.

This course critically examines the relationship between health status and social inequalities along the lines of race and ethnicity, social class and gender from a sociological perspective concentratring on how low socioeconomic status leads to poor health, how racial/gender bias affects medical care and health outcomes, and addresses ideas for reducing health disparities. Prerequisites: SO-121.

WS-384. Cultural Anthropology. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the development of anthropology as an offshoot from Sociology an examination of the differences in the methodology of anthropology and Sociology in the study of a variety of cultures. Prerequisites: SO-121 PL-100 OR PL-101 OR TH-110 OR TH-120.

WS-428. Literature, Culture and Society Issues: West Africa. 3 Credits.

A study of seminal texts representing the Malinke, Igbo, Ghanaian, Wolof, Bambara, and Senegalese peoples of West Africa.

WS-486. Seminar: Genocide. 3 Credits.

After a thorough conceptualization of genocide, the course will examine case studies of modern genocide, ranging from the 20th and 21st centuries.

WS-490. Urban Field Work. 3 Credits.

Introductory level of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required.

WS-491. Advanced Urban Field Work. 3 Credits.

Advanced level of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required.

WS-492. Urban Internship. 3 Credits.

Advanced levels of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required.

WS-493. Advanced Urban Internship. 3 Credits.

Advanced levels of field work emphasizing synthesis of social theories with work experience. Seminars held and an evaluation paper required.

WS-495. Internship in International Settings. 3 Credits.

Planned and supervised off-campus working experiences overseas or with international organizations integrated with independent academic study under the tutelage of the Director of International and intercultural Studies.