Special Academic Resources

Freshman Advising and the First Year Experience

Dr. Nicole DeCapua, Dean of Freshmen and Sophomores

The freshman advising and First Year Experience Program provide the opportunity for first-year students to become active in the Saint Peter’s University community, develop a clear sense of identity, and articulate their personal and academic goals as they learn to become men and women for others.

First-year students are advised by full-time faculty members who have received extensive academic advising training, and offer expertise in a variety of major disciplines. This relationship is further enhanced by enrollment in the Freshman Seminar, which all first year students are required to take during the fall semester. These special course sections are taught by the first-year faculty advisors, and are limited to first-year students only. They are also restricted in size so to enhance the faculty-student relationship. After the first year, students receive academic advising from an advisor in their major department, or if undeclared, students are advised by a faculty or professional advisor who specializes in advising undecided students.

In addition, the Saint Peter's first year programs include a two-day Summer Orienta­tion; peer mentorship programs (GEMS), first-year student workshops (STEP-UP), and a common reading program. These programs are designed to promote a smooth transition from high school to college, serve to enhance basic and critical learning skills required for college success, help students to acclimate and connect to critical offices and members of the University community, integrate co-curricular activities with the classroom experience, and provide overall support during the first year. Detailed information regarding all first-year programming is located on the University’s website.

In addition, the Saint Peter's first year programs include a one-day Peacock Prep Day, Weekend Orientation, peer mentorship programs (GEMS and STEP-UP), first-year student workshops, and a common reading program. These programs are designed to promote a smooth transition from high school to college, enhance basic and critical learning skills required for college success, help students to acclimate and connect to critical offices and members of the University community, integrate co-curricular activities with the classroom experience, and provide overall support during the first year. Detailed information regarding all first-year programming is located on the University’s website.

Advising Center

Faculty advisors staff the Academic Advising Center, which provides students with additional assistance regarding class scheduling, registration, course guidance and general academic questions.

Academic Success Program (ASP) and Summer Academy

Tushar Trivedi, Director

Students who are conditionally admitted have access to supplemental academic assistance prior to and during freshman year through the Academic Suc­cess Program (ASP). ASP students are identified by Admissions as having the potential for success but may require extra support to reach that potential. A key component of ASP is the Summer Academy, a three-week intensive program, designed to facilitate the transition from high school to college—in which students take an engaging, interdisciplinary course to sharpen their reading, writing, and math skills, while earning three academic credits towards graduation. Students are placed in ASP learning labs in the fall semester of freshman year to reinforce study skills and time management and receive dedicated faculty advising. The Coordinator of the Program also assists the Dean of Freshmen and Sophomores and freshmen faculty advisors throughout the academic year in monitoring the academic performance of these students and provides students with personalized guidance and support. The ASP program also offers tutoring services, workshops, and community service learning projects. Additional assistance is available through the orientation program, developmental courses, and tutorial assistance provided by the Center for the Advancement in Lan­guage and Learning (CALL).

Developmental Programs

Before registration, entering students take placement tests in composition, read­ing, and mathematics, which determine their enrollment in specific composition and mathematics courses. Based on their placement results, students who need supplemental academic assistance in composition, reading, mathematics, and reasoning ability, may be required to take one or more developmental courses. Tutoring assistance is also provided through the Center for the Advancement of Language and Learning. These developmental courses do not carry academic credit and may not be applied towards degree requirements.

The Center for Advancement In Language and Learning (CALL)

Barbara Melchione, Director

The Center for Advancement in Language and Learning (CALL) provides tutors and supplemental academic instruction for students. CALL staff train student tutors who maintain a high grade point average and are approved by a subject-area professor. The Center offers assistance in writing and mathematics as well as certain other subjects. Help with study skills, reading improvement, and all phases of research paper development is also available.

Center for English Language Acquisition and Culture (CELAC)

Alicia D'Amato, Director

Created to address the needs of our culturally and linguistically diverse student population, CELAC offers a wide range of resources to support and promote academic success for students whose first or strongest language is not English. Along with having a variety of undergraduate writing and reading classes, we also offer courses in English as a Second Language for students and community members who are seeking to improve their English skills.